The Truest and Purest Humanity is Children

American Writer

Educators today face a collection of challenges to their eagerness to
teach,
including unproven standards that limit more than inspire
students and educators alike. This approach delivers uncommitted education
engagements. The problem is the one-size-fits-all mentality, which teaching to a
standard will result in some quantifiable improvement. In reality, every student
is different; promoting that difference promotes greatness that is measurable
outside the standard. The problem to solve for, can modern education inspire
true potential at the individual level? Is there room in modern humanity for limitless greatness?

A powerful humanity component but often ignored is children.
“Children do not have the problems, we old people create, but they do have
solutions that are straightforward simple and realistic because in the child’s
mind, everything is possible”. Solving the world’s problems is grounded in
academia’s focused not of the limit of humanity, but the infinite possibilities.
A potential focus will require a  different kind of thinking. The solution points to the young and old working  together. Children have a grounding effect; they take the complexity out of life
and make it simple.

The truest and purest humanity is children, yet we from K1 to graduate school we place such short emphasis are they unlimited potential of the  child’s mindset. The term limit was defined by and adult, this term does not  exist in a child mind until it is taught to the child.  Dr. Pete

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


Our Founding Fathers Created A Dream

American Writer

Our Founding Fathers created a dream. The dream is a country where hard work, dedication to family, dedication to a country means something special. Our Founding Fathers  created a dream; over 200 years ago before any preconceived notion could have  formed about the importance of this dream. Preconceived convictions that society  must govern itself, that leadership should not be monarchs by birth. That leadership voted into office by the people, represents true leadership in a  self-govern society.

The people who select  their leaders, to represent them, to represent the desires of society to grow,  learn, and be self-satisfied with the world around it. Not reaching  complacency, but establishing a rewarding life in a nation’s domain. These  selected leaders become the left and right arm of those who put them in office.  We the People, our nation’s modern day descendants of the Founding Fathers, in  the truest sense, a nation of immigrants still creating American dreams.

We are witnessing these  dreams at the speed of technology in real-time, the first modern emergence is The Tea Party. Simply the tip of the iceberg of change, proof that the  founding Father’s dreams are still alive-and-kicking today.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


Social Influence of Learning. . . Rediscover Often!

Dr. Pietro Savo

Much of what we learn has a direct  correlation to the social influence of learning. Economic doom and gloom create a struggle that students of all ages experience. The struggle that keeps the  next generation away from attending higher education is the struggle that  continues to reduce any chance of eliminating the economic doom and gloom.


The United States higher education industry, 
we are beginning to import more students from other countries than educate our home grown version.

This economic college and university strategy has created an American talent decay that affects the entire United  States in the areas of engineering, technology, and manufacturing.

Higher education is a business, the struggle to fill classrooms; the higher-education enrolment solution’s makers take them to where the students are, well outside our U.S. borders.


In a devastating economy
, developing renewed higher education success is critically dependent on cultural adaptability. Cultural adaptability is a rediscovering process critical to the survival of any business; yes, higher education is a business. Colleges and universities have learned to adapt. An article from the NY Time February 5, 2012 talks about freshmen that come from abroad, most are from China, each pays tuition three times as much as students from United States and the classrooms are full. The higher education industry adapts to stay alive, at the cost of the US talent base.

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the impact of higher education comes in the form of lower unemployment rates. For example; a person with a high school diploma 10.3% unemployment rate (UR), associate’s degree 7.00% UR, bachelor’s degree 5.4% UR, master’s degree 4.0 UR, and doctoral degree 1.9% UR.

 Foreign countries have invested heavily in higher education to improve their unemployment statistics and improved their engineering, technology, and manufacturing bases at the same time; a very smart economic strategy!


What we know for sure
the education markets will continue to evolve, and the
amount of market change is unknown; what is clear is that “The Markets Drive the education spending, and the education spend drives our economy” and college and university resiliency are vital to capture this market change.

When self, influenced by rediscovery, the social influence of learning sets the stage. We have some work to do, all the books that have been written about the rediscovering process can be summed up into one rule; “Rediscover, rediscover often, and never stop rediscovering and the natural by-product becomes success!

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


THE FUTURE OF THE CAREER COLLEGE IS TODAY – Aligning with the needs of job creators…


January 2014
Today’s career college looks ahead while embracing both the present and future. It is empowered by the positive impact on higher education trending toward this unlimited future. The setback is that leadership from the education community and the job creators is not in alignment. Everyone is fighting for education market share or finding the best employee, which leads to the old standards for business growth. Everyone is in it only for himself or herself with no regard for bringing greater value to students and the job seekers. Fight to the top, and win at any cost. Both groups appear more focused on specific technology or tasks, not on lifelong learning to enhance education and job-creating productivity. That brings us to suggest the business problem to solve is having the right education offering to meet employer resource demands. 

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, January 2014 page 42

The business problem is how can the education community align itself with the job creators.  The old standard of having the best brand name, self-perceived education offering or providing the best contact network is not enough. Are leaders ready to align in a way that promotes the right education offering that will encourage economic job-sustained growth both present and future?   All the signs favor that the look-ahead at leadership, as it pertains to keeping education programs tied closely to the needs of employers, is taking shape. This engagement takes us to an international reach supported by the career college community. This community is also determined to improve future look-aheads to education designs closely connected to the needs of the current and future job creators.

The hints about the future are scattered around us in plain view. Our community must open up our minds to the possibilities. Take a different look, use a second set of eyes that are open wide, and you just might be able to watch the possibilities turn into realities. Is this a philosophy or just wishful thinking? In my opinion, this represents the futuristic employer and the educator trends worth sharing. This future is only a split second away. These futuristic trends and strategy hints come from leadership teaming between career college communities and employers. Teaming promotes new job creator and education best practices.

Career college leaders are continually working to keep programs tied closely to the needs of employers. The future is keeping education relevant; leadership representing future employers will get connected and start mentoring early in the workforce higher education process, according to the Business Economics article “On the Importance of Education.” This outreach at the academic level will improve the ability to modify curriculum on the fly to meet changes in the business market. The market drives the business. The future is the career college community leading the teaming among colleges,  universities and vocational institutions, developing career trade education programs that speed up the process from education to a well-paying job.

The global employment economy will help to shape the future. Education supported by leadership in the future should be as encompassing as humanities’ diversity of culture. In the era of globalization, skill requirements of employers are clearly changing. According to the Journal of Business Economics and Management, employers in the future will require education programs that take into account cultural differences that will shape business organizations. Knowing how to build good relationships is an education that is cultural and is always changing. Future employers will demand the workforce’s adaptability.

The future leadership has identified the most important skills to succeed in the workplace: problem-solving, oral communication and ethics, as noted in a report from Tertiary Education and Management. Survey the job creators to discover how higher education can improve  education and training to reduce the gap between job and education offering.

According to the Journal of Industrial Relations, future employees have indicated that job satisfaction plays a very important role in creating customer satisfaction. Job creators have a stronger alignment with the career college community using market influences and trends to determine education practices that mold a person to having a higher job satisfaction.

All these points fall neatly in with the next education evolution spearheading major change: massive open online courses (MOOCs), a concept pressuring the more traditional online college and universities to rethink, retool, adapt, and try to stay in the education business. History is full of creative education ideas that arrive just in time to change all the rules and send the nonbelievers into a tailspin. In business, they represent what I call disruptive innovation, ideas, products and services that help create a new market and value network. You see corporations accustomed to making a profit in business embracing MOOCs as an efficient education tool to create better-trained workers at a smart, reasonable cost.  Companies such as AT&T, Google and others help design and even fund Web-based college classes. MOOCs provide a window into forces shaping the future of education and how the career college community can proactively engage in that influencing process.

Most MOOCs seem to be sponsored by large universities. The predicted volume of employers embracing the MOOC process will demand speed to market. Speed to market is not a trait that traditional  education institutions are best known for. The future belongs to the education community best equipped to develop and deploy to both national and regional audiences on topics of many special job-support programs quickly. The future is pleading for the career college community to take the leadership role in developing a second stage of MOOC industry. This writer suggests your institution reach out to business organizations and ask them what they are looking for in present and future employees. Warning: Before you reach out to businesses, be prepared to develop and deploy these MOOC programs quickly. Those institutions that master this will become the education masters of the future. For your day-to-day business operations to make money, focus on keeping education relevant by teaming among colleges, universities and vocational institutions. Be steadfast and accommodate the global employment economy, creating customers using job-market influences and trends to determine education practices. Finally, the modern-day education tools embracing unlimited technology spearheading this major education future are MOOCs, and the future is here today.

The future is on everyone’s mind. I predict the career college community will lead or pull other education organizations along kicking and screaming, if need be. Education that results in a vocation and is firmly cemented in our career college community begins with all of us. A vocation is the ultimate looking-ahead leadership journey.  Dr. Pete

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


No Skin In The Game

Then & Now

The original American politician was a farmer lawyer a business owner teacher, not a career politician but a career citizen with neighborhood community’s skin in the game. Who after the politicking was done, laws were created, and then these career citizens went back home to their own states to prosper their own lives. Those original part-time politicians or in the historical sense, our nation’s founding fathers and mothers were creators.

The current generations of politicians are only concerned about self-preservation, and promoting the fight that results in the next won election. Self-preservation does not create and leave the national environment better than they found it. Self-preservation only results in the preservation of the same while the many citizens become less educated and disillusioned.

It is time for the career citizens to take courage and to stand firm and defend the neighborhood’s community as the true heartland of America.

Dr. Pete

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


STEM Field’s Talent Shortage

Stem Field

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, September 2012 addition page 50.

“STEM Fields” Talent Shortage; How the United States can regain its competitiveness in math- and science-related fields. Career College Central Magazine, September 2012

For the past 100 years, technological innovations in science and engineering have fueled the U.S. economy, produced good jobs and an extraordinary standard of living, and established the United States as an international economic leader. Our nation’s international segment of industries focused on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), though, is in profound decline, as documented in the “Science and Engineering Indicators: 2012″ study by the National Science Board. The study concludes that STEM education and entrepreneurial thinking has taken a back seat to empirical learning, resulting in a decline in good jobs. “We do not have nearly enough people who are capable in the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math,” said Margaret Spellings, former U.S. Secretary of Education from 2005 to 2009.

The U.S. economy relies heavily on jobs resulting from innovation. This makes selecting the means How the United States can regain its competitiveness in math- and science-related fields to ensure the sustained growth of the U.S. economy and job creating industries paramount. Job-creating industries are dependent on the nation’s college graduates being trained to decipher, understand, and identify industry solutions from historical case studies. Case studies correlating to present-day educational obstacles can provide a heads-up display for market changes, diversity of markets, and the ability to adapt to markets with a historical perspective. Having a strong focus on STEM fields reduces the talent shortage and increases learning from past education mistakes.

In the last 20 years, the skills needed for employment have become more technology related. This requires workers to have stronger backgrounds in science and engineering. The U.S. Census Bureau reported that the number of workers in science and engineering occupations grew by nearly 800 percent between 1950 and 2000. Our nation has a thirst for STEM occupations, which is revealed in the lower unemployment statistics of STEM graduates.

Here is the big problem: The cost of waiting for old ideas to catch up with modern job-creation practices obstructs new market opportunities. Such obstructions represent a stream of wasteful practices, making it difficult to be competitive in today’s volatile markets. The loss of competitiveness results in lost work and higher unemployment statistics. According to U.S. Department of Labor information cited in the 2012 CNN Money article “The 86 Million Invisible Unemployed,” 86 million people without jobs have simply given up looking for a job. How do we bring together our combined academic experiences and industry expertise to reverse this serious educational trend? The talent solutions will come from colleges and universities that move quickly to embrace STEM education concepts, neither tolerating nor accepting limits set by bureaucratic regulations. Teachers are ready to make such change. With quick changes to curricula that encourage and promote STEM fields, the value of such an education can inspire students in K-12.

“By taking on teaching and school counselor roles, STEM educated graduates from our nation’s teaching colleges and universities become the compulsory inspiration for our young people.”

New K-12 teachers and school counselors become the natural first line of observation. STEM practitioners become vital to identifying students with a gift for the sciences. The secret sauce is in stimulating learning in students who do not know they have the ability to excel in STEM fields. These students have the strongest probability for success and become future job creators and industry leaders.

Educated teachers and school counselors in STEM can help students develop their own learning experiences and science skill sets. New experiences and skill sets become the bedrock of goal setting early in a student’s educational journey. In the pyramid design, we begin with the foundation of knowledge experienced through the empirical learning of teachers and school counselors.

The modern-day assessment tool that can easily be adapted to test the necessities of K-12 is called the Prior Learning Assessment. PLA is an important strategy for helping students progress toward higher education. Understanding a student’s prior learning is similar to adding a turbine supercharger to a four-cylinder education engine. After reviewing data collected from 62,475 students at 48 postsecondary institutions in a PLA study, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) shows that PLA students have better academic outcomes.

Climbing higher up the pyramid is a next-level opportunity to stimulate K-12 learning by concentrating on the combined strengths of parent involvement (PI) and interactive methodology (IM). A Need for More Role Models?” in the Journal of College Science Teaching, PI is the ultimate role model.

Students will enjoy learning and be motivated to learn if they are taught by a motivated role model who is of great influence to the student, such as a parent. Teachers and school counselors who encourage PI are more likely to receive the respect of both the student and parents. PI is significant because, as the education process continues, students gain confidence in discussing science with others long after school dismissal in the best learning environment – their homes. The final pyramid step is technology or IM – the ultimate evolutionary process. IM combines every level of technology that is available to the student in the school and home environments. Advancing a student’s sensory ability by using methodology fueled by technology stimulates levels of importance associated with STEM learning. IM becomes the natural byproduct and lowest common denominator linking STEM educators, researchers and students, establishing unlimited inspirational learning. Each level of learning becomes more exciting than the previous.

As seen above, the pyramid design has a foundation in STEM educated teachers and school counselors, who are trained with a robust student assessment process that aims for understanding a student’s prior learning. Including PI and adapting to IM are also vital. Using this model, we have a fighting chance with the benefits of STEM education and entrepreneurial thinking, resulting in a culture prepared to create good jobs.

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, September 2012 page 50

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


You Can’t Be Too Military Friendly

The most successful institutions do more than grant certificates and degrees. When schools go above and beyond awarding degrees and certificates to U.S. military service members, their families and veterans, this extra initiative opens up new opportunities for veterans and employers alike.

Career College Central

You Can’t Be Too Military Friendly published, Career College Central Magazine November 2013 Edition

Education is power, regardless of where you earn your credentials. Once you have earned an education, no one can take it from you. What we are attempting to understand is what schools do “above and beyond” awarding a degree or certificate to U.S. military service members, their families and veteran higher education students. What activities can colleges and universities embrace to engage their military communities? What I discovered is a genuine enthusiasm to work with the military community, which I am excited to share with you. My day job transports my entire education team face-to- face with thousands of service members  and their  families weekly. I   have determined from the many conversations I’ve personally conducted and witnessed that a veteran’s No.1 concern before taking on the ever-so-important mission of higher education is, “How will this education result in a well-paying job?” There is no easy way to answer that question. I have been privileged to engage in conversations with passionate people working with service members, their families and veterans attending universities and colleges coast to coast.

No.1 concern before taking on the ever-so-important mission of higher education is, “How will this education result in a well-paying job?

These committed individuals include educators, administrators and staff who are doing everything in their power  to help these special students engage in and complete the right education to reach their dream careers. I have identified many college and university practices that current and future student-veterans may find well worth exploring.

The right education results in  the best future. I  selected the most veteran-oriented  schools through  research based  on certain keywords: military, college, jobs, career and education. These search words yielded a diverse group of higher education institutions not typically grouped together. They included Florida National University in Miami, Fla.; Grantham University in Kansas City, Mo.; Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas; and Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, Mass. We do not see a list of institutions such as these advertising together in any higher education marketing venue as military-friendly, but they have made commitments to service members and veterans that are well worth writing about.

In my many and endless conversations with school officials, one comment left me speechless – the school official actually thought we had lost the phone connection because I stopped talking. Dr. Ryan Van Dusen, Associate Director of Military and Veterans Programs for Texas Tech University and a former soldier in the U.S. Army, said, “You can’t be too military-friendly.” That statement by Van Dusen left me in stunned silence, which rarely happens. The most basic question that can be asked of a college or university is how it works to ensure that an education at that institution can result in a well-paying job. The answer, on the other hand, is much more complex; there is no simple list of  tasks an  institution can check off.

However, I did witness a common element among the successful  institutions; they  are all characterized  by the  passion to do more than grant certificates and degrees.

The principle of “you can’t be too military-friendly” became  clear as  a guiding  force and defining characteristic of the following schools:

Grantham University (GU) was founded in 1951 by World War II veteran Donald Grantham, who wanted to help fellow veterans improve their lives through higher education. Grantham University is a 100-percent online university serving a highly diverse student population. I spoke with Johanna Altland, Grantham University’s Director of Communications, and she spoke at length about educator obligations. To paraphrase Altland, the best way we can be advocates for veterans is by educating them to be career-ready, which is why we are all here in the first place. Grantham takes a multifaceted approach to student-veteran success. The university uses many internal and external initiatives to pave the way for future employment of veterans and service members. First, it educates its student-veterans; second, it prepares its student-veterans for employment in the civilian workforce. The university takes this model one step forward, smoothing the path for its students in the civilian job market by taking the time to educate employers on the value of hiring veterans.

This provides businesses with veteran recruitment strategies that benefit the veteran as well as the potential employer. The internal and external initiatives educate and prepare Grantham’s staff, their students and potential  employers. The cement that I believe holds this model together is twofold and includes Grantham Pathways, a virtual online job portal and a series of free e-books called Military-to-Civilian Transition Guide. This series comprises five books: Entering the Civilian Workforce – Your Journey Starts Here!, Choose a Career You’ll Love and Never Work a Day in Your Life, Professional Branding That Gets You Noticed, Make the “Call Pile” With Attention-Grabbing Resumes and Cover Letters, and How to Ace the Interview … and Stand Out From the Crowd.

Throughout my research, Grantham’s strategy to educate and prepare emerged as an obvious theme of delivering student-veteran successes. The internal and external initiatives educate and prepare Grantham’s staff, their students and potential employers. The cement that I believe holds this model together is twofold and includes Grantham Pathways, a virtual online job portal and a series of free e-books called Military-to-Civilian Transition Guide. This series comprises five books: Entering the Civilian Workforce – Your Journey Starts Here!, Choose a Career You’ll Love and Never Work a Day in Your Life, Professional Branding That Gets You Noticed, Make the “Call Pile” With Attention-Grabbing Resumes and Cover Letters, and How to Ace the Interview … and Stand Out From the Crowd. Throughout my research, Grantham’s strategy to educate and prepare emerged as an obvious theme of delivering student-veteran successes.

Florida National University (FNU) – Florida National University held its first class in 1988 in the city of Hialeah, Fla., under the name Florida International Institute.  A second campus opened in Miami one year later; a third campus was opened in a second Miami location in 1990. A fourth campus, the Online Learning Campus, was initiated in 2005. Florida National University offers Master’s, Bachelor’s and Associate degrees; diploma programs; and certificate programs. Florida National  University
President  Maria C.   Regueiro spoke with me about the university’s veteran support services. The needs of our honored service members, their families and veterans are many, said Regueiro. She went on to explain that the Florida National University team understands that travel and deployment can conflict with campus learning and provide a challenge for those in the military. Florida National University seeks to solve this problem with a combination of quality and flexibility, aiming to help service members obtain a career by providing them with online programs that are easy to access from wherever they are stationed. The university provides these students with academic advising, numerous resources and, most of all, support to carry on their academic dreams.

The university’s staff believes that one size does not match each military student’s needs. Instead, it develops and implements education programs that meet individual needs, backing these programs up with the university’s regional accreditation.The university’s student-veterans obtain more than an education; the institution’s career support stands out and continues to provide a resource to students long after graduation. The career support staff establishes a personal rapport with military students, giving them quick responses to their queries, concerns and needs. The staff believes it is critical to understand the limitations and special needs these students face, always letting them know that the university team members are there to support students in their career paths. Regueiro emphasized that the staff at Florida National University is grateful for the sacrifices student-veterans have made to preserve our freedom.

Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT is a technical design and engineering college. Wentworth was founded in 1904 and offers career-focused education through its 15 Bachelor’s degree programs in areas such as architecture, computer science, design, engineering, engineering technology and management, as well as Master ’s degrees in architecture and construction management. My conversation with Maureen Dischino, Executive Director of Admissions, and Jamie Kelly, Associate Vice President of Public Affairs, inspired in me an Oprah Winfrey-type “aha!” moment when they described two main student-veteran initiatives. The first initiative involves faculty mentors. Wentworth provides an informal student-veteran mentoring program, which provides student-veterans with a support structure in the form of mentors who have a military background. These mentors understand veterans’ history and have a common connection with them that helps the mentors have a positive impact on the students’ academic journeys, improving retention and completion rates and building lifelong relationships. Dischino  explained  that Wentworth  focuses on  trying to be as veteran-friendly as it can be.

Wentworth welcomes veteran relationships.   The counseling   center has   gone through specialized training to better support veterans and to take the concept of being veteran-friendly to a higher level. This  military-friendly training  begins with  the university’s commitment to veteran success and an understanding that careers and jobs play a critical role in veterans’ future. Wentworth looks for leadership qualities and maturity from students interested in pursuing careers, paying attention to the work student-veterans have done while in the military. That established leadership quality prepares student-veterans for memorable academic success at Wentworth. The second initiative is a co-op. Wentworth students’ job market industry advantage is fostered by a cooperative education (co-op) that touches more than 1,400 students each year, providing educational journeys that promote lifelong careers. Dischino said, ‘‘At Wentworth, we prepare students for specific careers.’’ Through two mandatory semesters of co-op, students fulfill a professional experience requirement needed to graduate. Wentworth’s co-op model creates the opportunity for potential employers to interact with Wentworth’s students, creating relationships built on motivated students seeking out real-world employment experiences. The co-op is an education model that links classroom learning with potential employers. Co-op students are paid by local, national and international employers, who then hire these students after graduation, resulting in an “education designed for return on investment (ROI).”

Texas Tech University (TTU)– Founded in 1923 on the South Plains of West Texas, Texas Tech is a comprehensive research university that retains the sense of a smaller liberal arts institution. Texas Tech earned my attention with a quote on its website by Kent Hance stating that the university “provides resources and educational opportunities needed to succeed in civilian life.” I found that intriguing, and I reached out to Van Dusen, who explained the Texas Tech University veteran support model. Working directly with the university’s huge career center, Texas employers come to Texas Tech because they know that the institution instills a work ethic that equals a success-oriented mindset in its students. Van Dusen added that having military experience today can make a student very marketable to prospective employers. Van Dusen pointed out that the career center is staffed by former U.S. military service members who help the military students translate their military experiences into terms civilian employers can understand.

This process of reframing professional experience becomes the foundation for a resume that demands attention from hiring companies. The career center supports the resume-building process and provides resources that improve interview skills.Many of the university’s student-veterans are 26 years old and feeling out of place attending college with 19-year-olds. They feel that they are already behind the bell curve. TTU strives to help military students understand that the experiences they gained in the military are going to put them significantly ahead of their non- military peers in terms of employment marketability.  Van Dusen went on to say that, for a veteran support career center to be truly effective, it must go well beyond being simply military- friendly – after all, “you can’t be too military-friendly.” TTU’s mission is to help any student who comes to the career center with a problem.
“Beyond military-friendly” appears to be Texas Tech University’s secret sauce to success, combined with their strong employer-community relationships.

We all have a responsibility to our military community to identify institutions that go beyond being simply military-friendly and have the attitude that you cannot be too military-friendly. When schools go above and beyond awarding degrees and certificates to U.S. military service members, their families and veterans, this extra initiative opens up new opportunities for veterans and employers alike.  Dr. Pete 

The featured institutions have implemented proven higher education solutions that are working across our great nation and prove that the principle “you can’t be too military-friendly” begins with you.

You Can’t Be Too Military Friendly published, Career College Central Magazine November 2013 Edition

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2011

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IDENTIFYING THE SIGNS – Military Students at Risk – Preventing Soldier Suicides

Transitioning American Veterans

IDENTIFYING THE SIGNS – Military Students at Risk originally published, Career College Central Magazine May 2013 Edition

Today, headlines in the media are dominated by politics, economic doom and gloom, the jobless rate, and citizens of other countries being murdered by their dictator leaders. However, the headline we should all be paying more attention to is the one that appeared in The Salt Lake Tribune last year: “More soldier suicides than combat deaths in 2012.” The soldiers of the U.S. military are defending and protecting all of the United States’ interests across our entire planet, only to come home and kill themselves.
With these new students landing in colleges and universities nationwide, academic leadership needs to understand suicide warning signs.

Since World War II and up until recently, U.S. military suicide rates have been lower than civilian rates, and wartime suicide rates in the military have historically dropped. Yet in 2008, the military suicide rate exceeded the civilian rate for people between 17 to 30 years of age, according to the study “Army Suicides: ‘Knowns’ and an Interpretative Framework for Future Directions.” With both wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, something dynamic transformed our U.S. military service members and increased the military suicide rates. signs are always there; it’s just a matter of making leadership accountable in regards to directing treatment. Bloxom is a former Staff Sergeant and Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran currently pursuing a higher education with hopeful ambitions of attending Rutgers University’s joint JD/MBA program. As an influx of U.S. military war veterans joins the ranks of higher education, we as educators have an obligation to support our heroes when they need us to do our part.

Many service members are leaving the military ranks and beginning their academic journeys due to the availability of education benefits they have earned while serving our nation. With these new students landing in colleges and universities nationwide,
academic leadership needs to understand suicide warning signs. Here are some common suicide warning signs taken from Suicide.org, an organization dedicated to preventing suicide:

  • Previous suicide attempt or behavior that has led to sefl-injury

  • Somatic symptoms, including sleep and pain complaints

  • Stressors such as marital or intimate relationship issues, legal, housing,
    and occupational problems

  • Current or pending disciplinary or legal action

  • Substance misuse

  • Problems with a major life transition (e.g., retirement, discharge, divorce, etc.)

  • Loss of a fellow warrior

  • Setbacks in military career or personal life

  • Severe, prolonged stress that seems unmanageable

  • Sense of powerlessness, helplessness or hopelessness

  • Behavior that isolates service members from friends, family members and
    educators

What is important to understand is that someone need not be an expert in suicide prevention to prevent a suicide.
The key is to have open eyes, communicate relentlessly and help the person rediscover that suicide can never be an option. Kevin Caruso from Suicide.org stated that 75 percent of those who die by suicide have some suicide warning signs. Our motivation must first be to save that 75 percent.

Suicide prevention

Suicide prevention should never be the responsibility of the experts; suicide is the responsibility of all. When we witness someone exhibiting suicide warning signs, we need to do everything we can to help them. Today, with the Internet and social media, a simple Google search provides endless ways to get help. Social networking websites for suicide prevention can connect people with common
experiences. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention Facebook pages provide links to suicide prevention websites and hotlines, as well as information about the warning signs of suicide. The power of communicating through social media can help us become more current with our reality. Today, social media is sharing ideas, valuable information and solutions at speeds that no organization could possibly hope to match. Colleges and universities can also
benefit from this limitless communication tool.

Every college and university has an internal suicide prevention reporting structure and resource. Research the
resources in your community and have this information available before you need it. Education from these sources is the best way help identify and prevent such a significant public health problem among U.S. military service members who are now enrolled at or entering colleges and universities nationwide.

Many universities’ suicide prevention programs engage in deploying various
technological mechanisms, including online training courses, social networking
and the sheer power of social media. Using the power of technology, we are
releasing the integral aspects of a comprehensive suicide prevention program.

This article is by no means a conclusion but only one chapter in
encouraging suicide prevention. As best said by Bloxom, “The problem to avoid is becoming an example at the next suicide awareness briefing.

Our goal as educators is to use the unlimited power of knowledge to reduce or eliminate suicide examples. We have become a key component to the solution regardless if we are ready or not, and we are now a part of the first line of defense for preventing soldier suicides.

Short list of suicide prevention resources:

References:

Britton, P., Ilgen, M.,
Valenstein, M., Knox, K., Claassen, C., & Conner, K. R. (2012). Differences
Between Veteran Suicides With and Without Psychiatric Symptoms. American Journal
Of Public Health, 102(S1), S125-S130.

Caruso, K., 2013. Suicide
Warning Signs.

Suicide.org is a 501c3
NON-PROFIT Organization and Website.

Christodoulou, C. C.,
Douzenis, A. A., Papadopoulos, F. C., Papadopoulou, A. A., Bouras, G. G.,
Gournellis, R. R., & Lykouras, L. L. (2012). Suicide and seasonality. Acta
Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 125(2), 127-146. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0447.2011.01750.x

Clinical digest. Steep rise
in soldier suicides coincides with military action in Iraq and Afghanistan.
(2012). Nursing Standard, 26(31), 15.

Griffith, J. (2012). Army
Suicides: “Knowns” and an Interpretative Framework for Future Directions.
Military Psychology, 24(5), 488-512.

Jones, M. D., Etherage, J.
R., Harmon, S., & Okiishi, J. C. (2012). Acceptability and cost-effectiveness of
military telehealth mental health screening. Psychological Services, 9(2),
132-143. doi:10.1037/a0026709

Judd, F., Jackson, H.,
Komiti, A., Bell, R., & Fraser, C. (2012). The profile of suicide: changing or
changeable?. Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, 47(1), 1-9.
doi:10.1007/s00127-010-0306-z

Manning, J., & VanDeusen,
K. (2011). Suicide Prevention in the Dot Com Era: Technological Aspects of a
University Suicide Prevention Program. Journal Of American College Health,
59(5), 431-433.

McCarthy, J., Blow, F.,
Ignacio, R., Ilgen, M., Austin, K., & Valenstein, M. (2012). Suicide Among
Patients in the Veterans Affairs Health System: Rural-Urban Differences in
Rates, Risks, and Methods. American Journal Of Public Health, 102(S1),
S111-S117.

McCloskey, M., 2012. More
soldier suicides than combat deaths in 2012. (2012, December 20). America’s
Intelligence Wire from McClatchy-Tribune Regional News – The Salt Lake Tribune -
Utah)

Lineberry, T. W., &
O’Connor, S. S. (2012). Suicide in the US Army. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 87(9),
871+.

Luxton, D. D., June, J. D.,
& Fairall, J. M. (2012). Social Media and Suicide: A Public Health Perspective.
American Journal of Public Health. 102(2), 195-200.

Parish, C., (2012)
Introduction of interventions led to decrease in suicides. (2012). Mental Health
Practice, 15(6), 5.

Pigeon, W., Britton, P.,
Ilgen, M., Chapman, B., & Conner, K. (2012). Sleep Disturbance Preceding Suicide
Among Veterans. American Journal Of Public Health, 102(S1), S93-S97.

Wiederhold, B. K. (n.d).
Lowering Suicide Risk in Returning Troops.

Career College Central

IDENTIFYING THE SIGNS – Military Students at Risk originally published, Career College Central Magazine May 2013 Edition

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2011

Business

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro

Education Blog Directory

Read, write, and question everything!
Our voices are powerful and true!

Pietro Savo E-Mail Link Dr.Pete@EducationIsPower.US

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Transitioning American Veterans

Transitioning American Veterans

We find ourselves challenged to support the strengths and needs of veterans as they transition from a military life to pursuing higher education. This challenge finds its home well within the framework of Schlossberg’s transition model, which was developed to assist with a broad range of life transitions. Many institutions of higher education have developed detailed service programs to boost veteran success in higher education.

What’s missing, and perhaps a barrier for success, is that the key to these programs lies in understanding the student-veteran mindset, which is becoming critical as more student-veterans seek to use their military education benefits.

The 2011 NACADA Journal article “Applying Schlossberg’s Model to Transitioning American Veterans” reports that an increasing number of student-veterans start the higher education journey with unseen injuries such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues. These unseen injuries increase the likelihood of lower retention and graduation rates. Student-veterans returning to colleges and universities typically have a higher level of education and a higher level of maturity than the traditional high school graduate because they have a more diverse experience base. This experience base can be an additional barrier that adds to the difficulty of understanding the student-veteran mindset.

Dr. Schlossberg’s study identified the means to overcome such a difficulty by a process that encourages an understanding of the student-veteran’s strengths, needs and challenges as they transition from the military life to the higher education journey.

We Speak A Different Language

Student-veterans are different. We take on life’s tasks as if they represent a mission. We are regimented, task-oriented and focused on the goals. We speak a different language that is easily distinguishable from one veteran to another. We communicate with experience gained from places and events that are both amazing and impossible to describe.

It’s a language that cannot be learned; it can only be earned. It defines our history and the level of trust granted.

Schlossberg’s Transition Model

Schlossberg’s transition model focuses on a series of human interactions that produce a desired result as a means to promote higher education success.

Schlossberg model promote dynamic change that influences the sense of competency which becomes a clear connection between a student-veteran and an institution of higher education. A connection when applied, results in higher retention, degree completion rates and a productive, transitioning American veteran.

About Dr. Nancy K. Schlossberg

Dr. Nancy K. Schlossberg established the Office of Women in Higher Education at the American Council of Education, and she has served on the faculties of Wayne State University, Howard University and Pratt University. Her published books include: Getting the Most out of College (2001); Going to Plan B: How You Can Cope, Regroup and Start Your Life on a New Path (1996); Improving Higher Education Environments for Adults (1989); Counseling Adults in Transition (1984); and Perspectives on Counseling Adults (1978).

Download and read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, July 2012 addition page 50

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

American Writer a Positive Thinking Movement by Dr. Pietro Savo

Dr. Pietro Savo


Courageous Citizens Who Banded Together

Constitutional Republic
As a modern day society, it appears we have forgotten the groups of courageous citizens who banded together and risked everything to create our constitutional republic. A constitutional republic that many generations before us have been blessed to enjoy. The problem today is that liberals, moderates, and conservatives focus more on the argument than the actual importance of having the argument. Agree or not, the disagreement of different political viewpoints represents the only true important factor in the rhetoric. Because we must never stop debating, never stop disagreeing, and never stop questioning because that is what constitutional republic stands for.

A constitutional republic is not a polite and pretty entity; it can become fearful for the light-at-heart. When we stop arguing, when the rhetoric becomes one-sided, when any side is no longer willing to question, we achieve pure submission. Submission does not work in a constitutional republic; submission is not liberty nor is it being free. What does this all mean, there is no real republic without passionate rhetoric!

When we stop arguing, when the rhetoric becomes one-sided, when any side is no longer willing to question, we achieve pure submission. Submission does not work in a democracy; submission is not liberty nor is it being free!

Regardless of where your political beliefs reside, be it left, middle or right, is not the concern, what is important is questioning our government to keep them honest and true to our best wishes. When we are questioning, we’re pro-actively taking the time to understand each issue that interests us, and affects us, as long as we independently determine our own belief at the end of the day that is true constitutional republic. Read, write, and question everything!

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