Our Founding Fathers Created A Dream

We celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation, our Founding Fathers created a dream. The dream is a country where hard work, dedication to family, dedication to a country means something special. Our Founding Fathers created a dream; over 200 years ago before any preconceived notion could have formed about the importance of this dream. Preconceived convictions that society must govern itself, society must be free, and society must be safe.

Founding Fathers

Historian Richard B. Morris in 1973 identified the following seven figures as the key Founding Fathers: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington.

9/11 terrorist attacks changed all the rules, resulted in changing attitudes and concerns about safety and vigilance. On 9/12 we awoke once again in our fight for independence from fear, and threats never before witnessed here in the US. Born from this historic need is the multifaceted self-preservation model called Homeland Security.

Our Founding Fathers created a dream. The dream is a country where hard work, dedication to family, dedication to a country means something special. Our Founding Fathers created a dream; over 200 years ago before any preconceived notion could have formed about the importance of this dream. Preconceived convictions that society must govern itself, society must be free, and society must be safe.

The people who select  their leaders, to represent them, to represent the desires of society to grow,  learn, and be self-satisfied with the world around it. Not reaching complacency, but establishing a rewarding life in a nation’s domain. These selected leaders become the left and right arm of those who put them in office.  We the People, our nation’s modern day descendants of the Founding Fathers, in the truest sense, a nation of immigrants still creating American dreams.

We are witnessing these dreams once again, Homeland Security includes every citizen of the United States. Our Mission is to: (1) Prevent, (2) Secure, (3) Enforce, (4) Safeguard, and (5) Strengthen

by  Dr. Pietro Savo © 2015

US Navy Veteran  “Non Sibi Sed Patriae”

pietrosavousa@me.com 


Make a Difference to a Veteran

veteran difference

Make a Difference to a Veteran by Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo, You might believe your school is doing all it can, but it’s likely you can do more to understand the sacrifices made by the former service members seated in your classrooms.

 You might believe your school is doing all it can, but it’s likely you can do more to understand the sacrifices made by the former service members seated in your classrooms.

What colleges can do to better understand the sacrifices made by our former service members seated in our class. The biggest repayment you can offer them is providing a quality education that will result in a lifelong career.

Original Published: Career College Central Magazine. May 2015

The Middle East and Afghanistan are the war zone regions that keep the United States military engaged. Regardless of what our politicians tell us, the end of war for our service members is far from over.

Military service members volunteer for two reasons:

1. An absolute patriotic love of our country.

2.To earn college tuition and ultimately a degree that will result in a productive life and career. Joining the greatest military organization in the world to go to college is an inspiring example of earning a college education the hard way.

The price of serving in the military is the loss of many future memories, such as missed birthdays, anniversaries, weddings and graduations while in training or deployed overseas away from family and home. To me, the worst part of military deployment was not the risk of war, but missing family and not being home for those special memories. The true emotional discomfort came from having to read about those missed family events in a handwritten letter. Today, with so many technologic advances, email, Skype and cell phones have replaced the letters of yesterday. With technology, missed special memories are in real time and are equally as painful.

The greatest thank-you for your service can come in the form of providing quality education that will result in a lifelong career. The perfect thank-you comes not through special treatment, but through understanding that a veteran student is someone who has excelled in unimaginable environments.

Returning from war, service members become lost in the crowd of their surroundings. We are often thanked for our service, but I will admit it does feel unnatural when this happens – although I do remember a time when service members were not thanked or even acknowledged for their service. For that reason, I find myself thanking service members every chance I can as well. In the story of service members, we see the spirit of America’s past and future. When our country needed us most, we stepped forward. We raised our right hand and swore a solemn oath. We put on that uniform and earned the title veteran, which we carry to this day, regardless of whether we were a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine or Coast Guardsman. We are part of a brotherhood and sisterhood that often stops us in our tracks to listen to the latest news reported from the war zone. We listen to the newscasters; we remember our own time serving; we understand, and this connection is never severed.

We return from serving with battles won and many more battles forgotten with the hope that our military detour in life was not in vain. For some, this detour is our life. We return much different from when we left because we are different. We take on life’s tasks as if they represent a mission. We are regimented, mature, task oriented and focused on the goal of obtaining a higher education.

Many of us who have landed in academia as professors find ourselves as challenged as the non-veteran professors to support the strengths and needs of veterans as they transition from a military life to pursuing higher education. What can colleges do to better understand the sacrifices made by our former service members seated in our classrooms? The greatest thank-you for your service can come in the form of providing quality education that will result in a lifelong career. The perfect thank-you comes not through special treatment, but through understanding that a veteran student is someone who has excelled in unimaginable environments. For professors who understand this reality, veteran students become the inspiration for the remainder of their class and faculty.

The value of a veteran student is this: Veterans read what is assigned, have a serious look of interest during your lecture, and are the first to raise their hands to ask a question or volunteer an answer. The veterans in your class find each other before you find them. Therefore, you ask, what is the problem we need to solve for veterans in our colleges? Perhaps it’s more of a solution we need to recognize. For example, one problem service members have when transitioning from the military environment to college is having to wait a whole month for the VA housing allowance check to arrive. During this period, service members are homeless. My suggestion is that colleges can solve this problem simply by donating unused dorm rooms to enrolled veterans until the VA housing allowance money is available.

Another problem veterans face is finding summer jobs that allow them to earn money to keep their apartments during summer break. Perhaps my first suggestion applies here as well. Colleges can solve this problem simply by donating unused dorm rooms to the enrolled veterans. The big picture is that the veteran population is less than 1 percent of the U.S. population, and no veteran should ever be homeless. Today, the majority of veterans using their GI education benefits are war veterans. This logical housing solution becomes common sense. Colleges that offer free housing to their enrolled veteran students become the recognized patriots and recognized leaders in the higher education community.

Be the one to make a difference to a veteran!

by  Dr. Pietro Savo © 2015

US Navy Veteran  “Non Sibi Sed Patriae”

pietrosavousa@me.com 


The K-12 system isn’t graduating students ready to take on a higher education

The gap between K-12 and higher education

The gap between K-12 and higher education

The gap between K-12 and higher education – Disconnected

Originally Published NOVEMBER 2012 www.CareerCollegeCentral.com

The true power of higher education has been receiving a great deal of attention in the media lately. This exposure appears to gain greater momentum during the national elections. Modern U.S. high school students have developed heightened educational ambitions. More than 88 percent of middle school students surveyed expect to partake in some form of post secondary education. In October 2011, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 68.3 percent of 2011 high school graduates were currently enrolled in colleges or universities. American College Testing (ACT) released the 2012 edition of “The Condition of College & Career Readiness” report based on information collected from high school graduates taking the ACT College and Career Readiness exam. This year is the first time more than half of the U.S. high school graduating class took the ACT exam. The data reported indicates that more than a quarter of the students did not meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for English, mathematics, reading and science.

The results clearly suggest that a significant number of students enrolled as college and university freshmen this fall have not been adequately prepared by their high schools to produce college level work or to adequately perform in a rigorous higher education environment (Lawrence, 2012). This lack of preparation is not an entirely new phenomenon; the Stanford Policy Brief released in 2003 indicated that 40 percent of students in four-year institutions took some remedial education as compared with 63 percent at two-year institutions. These rates are symptoms of a greater problem: Our high-school students are not prepared for college and university work, a reality that has clearly become the norm. The current compulsory education systems result in a lack of understanding among students, parents and K-12 teachers regarding what conditions students require to be able to succeed in higher education (Venezia, 2003). A contributing problem is a lack of student preparedness – the education preparedness link between high school and college simply does not exist.

High schools teach from knowledge bases and skill sets that do not fulfill college entrance and placement requirements. This lack of consistency leads to students graduating from high school under one set of academic principles and, three months later, finding themselves required to participate under a completely new set of academic principles in college and university settings. As a result, higher education resources are fruitlessly spent on inadequately prepared students – education dollars that could be better spent cultivating knowledge that would prove relevant to higher education and prepare students for successful, productive futures. We can all agree that students entering higher education without the basic skills needed to be successful, competitive and truly efficient in the higher education environment is unacceptable.

Is the end goal a set of deliberately defined classes of people? Regardless, we as a community are wasting our number one resource: our children.

Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said at the 2012 Republican Convention, “The greatest ally in controlling your response to your circumstances has been a quality education. But today, when I can look at your Zip code and I can tell whether you’re going to get a good education, can I honestly say it does not matter where you came from, it matters where you are going? The crisis in K-12 education is a threat to the very fabric of who we are.”

Clearly, students’ locales determine the standard of education and this standard has become a dollars-and-cents problem. Poor communities have a demonstrably lower quality of education. Does this discrepancy really have financial causes, or do schools have too many standards and no accountability? Is the end goal a set of deliberately defined classes of people? Regardless, we as a community are wasting our number one resource: our children.

Linked – LinkedIn connection

The main problem as I see it is that the students’ preparations between high school and college are not linked; pondering the need for this “linked” element leads me to surmise that perhaps social media and its limitless education outreach could possibly support the joined efforts of many stakeholders in education, resulting in reducing or eliminating the K-12 and college /university disconnect altogether. To test this idea, I turned to LinkedIn. LinkedIn purports itself to be the world’s largest professional network, with more than 175 million members; the site permits its users to exchange knowledge, ideas and opportunities with a large network of professionals. This exchange of knowledge and ideas stimulated me to write this article.

I posted the following question on five education-related discussion groups on LinkedIn: “I believe higher education cannot create success unless K-12 does; what do you say?” I found that many members shared a similar opinion to mine, regardless of where the members were located in the world. The current education systems are not prepared to address students’ needs across education systems, many members agreed, and no one is held accountable for issues related to student transitions from high school to college/university. This was the consensus among LinkedIn professionals from the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Trinidad/Tobago, Australia, India and South Africa.

These ideas were suggested as solutions during our discussion:

  1. Greater talk about the skill of learning; increased communication internally and externally with the entire education community
  2. Equipping students for learning for the rest of their lives, both for higher education and for life beyond college
  3. Competent administrators who have a clear vision of what 21st century teaching and a removal of the “this is how we have always done it” mindset from the education community
  4. Removal of barriers earlier in K-12 to create a quality education environment before postsecondary education
  5. Adoption of ideas that work, which are shared with the entire education community
  6. Parent involvement and resources offered to parents that instruct them on how to support their children in learning
  7. Provision of “thirteenth-year” counselors at the high school level
  8. Creation of partnerships between colleges/universities and elementary/high schools
  9. Programs patterned after Google’s Successful Transitions And Retention Track (START), a program that takes high school dropouts and creates amazing success stories.

Perhaps the education community can take this concept and engage students before they drop out of school altogether and create this type of successful environments in high schools.

From these nine points, a picture emerges of engaging students earlier in the education process and promoting a successful educational transition from K-12 to higher education. For this to happen, partnerships must be formed between colleges, universities and their local K-12 schools. I believe that the great minds and spirits of all our citizens are clearly our number one natural resource. Collaborative efforts between the K-12 and the higher education community are important and powerful.

Modern technology forces change upon us at an unlimited pace; can the education community keep up and adapt to this change while improving education quality? Since belief is 99 percent of reality, I believe the education community can keep up and adapt to this change while improving educational quality when we collaborate, communicate and equip students to learn for the rest of their lives.

Citations:

Lawrence, J. (2012). “ACT Report Shows 2/3 of US Students Aren’t College-Ready.” Retrieved from EducationNews.org, August 2012, (2)

Zelkowski, J. (2011, May). “Defining the intensity of high school mathematics: Distinguishing the difference between college-ready and college-eligible students.” American Secondary Education, 39 (2), 27-49. Available from:

Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA.

Venezia, A., Kirst, M., Antonio, A., (2003). “Betraying the College Dream: How Disconnected K-12 and Postsecondary Education Systems Undermine Student Aspirations, Final Policy Report From Stanford.” University Bridge Project., 72

by AMERICAN WRITER
Dr. Pietro Savo © 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015


Manufacturing Success-Evolving to adapt to changes in the manufacturing industry

Manufacturing Success

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. How can we rejuvenate it? And how would career colleges benefit from a manufacturing renaissance?

Manufacturing Success

By Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. Both print and online media document new automated technology and outline the lack of competitive advantage to improve operational efficiency. This inefficiency led to many manufacturing plants closing and a climbing unemployment rate. The result is a loss of U.S. manufacturing knowledge and manufacturing jobs. Historically, the manufacturing workforce was often composed of family members who had worked for generations at the same plant. The sharing of manufacturing knowledge occurred at the dinner table. In addition, skilled workers rose through the ranks and held management positions, thereby expanding the knowledge beyond the family. In this way, manufacturing knowledge continued to grow through the sharing of ideas.

As competition increased and methodologies changed, the required skill set changed. Remaining competitive meant hiring managers with university-generated business skills and little or no hand-on manufacturing experience. These highly educated and poorly experienced leaders began encouraging the older manufacturing generation to retire – or simply downsized them altogether. This meant a continued loss of historical and hands-on knowledge over the last 50 years. In 1950, manufacturing was about 35 percent of total employment. In 2004, this number dropped to only 13 percent, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland economic commentary “Why Are We Losing Manufacturing Jobs?” In 2014, the number was only 6.6 percent. These changes made learning from the past difficult at best.

I began to write this article over 30 years ago when I was a production manufacturing worker at Sikorsky Aircraft. I witnessed the jobs leaving firsthand. Thirty years later while conducting research for my doctoral dissertation, I discovered that the missing link to that mass exodus of jobs was the devastating loss of manufacturing knowledge. This discovery prompted the need to create a potential solution rooted in two very important U.S. industries: the career college and manufacturing communities. My research identified the career college sector as the community best equipped to support this ground-level important function in our nation.

The career college community is grounded firmly in a context that is best equipped to support the U.S. manufacturing industry, because career colleges, universities and vocational schools are closest to the workforce. Bringing well-paying manufacturing jobs back is critical to the future of our sector. The global labor market has become strong outside the U.S. because of the high labor cost stigma associated with the U.S. economy. Heightened domestic costs empowered millions of people around the world to compete for U.S. jobs. This increased global competition led to downsizing of the manufacturing sector in the U.S. Many products formerly manufactured in the U.S. are now manufactured in part or in whole elsewhere in the world. U.S. companies outsourced manufacturing because the company’s leaders honestly believed American workers held no competitive advantage over cheap offshore labor. This strategy caused great devastation by halting investments in manufacturing technology and education. When companies do not have the additional capital generated from higher revenue to invest back into the business, the result is a loss of competitive advantage and shared knowledge.

The U.S. economy relies heavily on manufacturing, meaning that the sustained growth of the manufacturing industry is paramount to economic stability. The purpose of this article is to introduce the feasibility of a certification to bridge the gap between manufacturing and research in the U.S. by establishing a side-by-side value education partnership that links manufacturing industries and the career college community.

The researcher sought to understand the challenges from both a practitioner’s and researcher’s perspective. Manufacturing leaders participating in the survey for the feasibility study were from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Rolls Royce, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and United Technologies; the survey also included supply chain leaders from the U.S. government. Eighty percent of the survey respondents agreed that there is a need for a new manufacturing practitioner certification. Eighty-three percent of the survey respondents agreed that a new certified professional would improve manufacturing productivity through focused career education. Ninety-four percent of the survey respondents agreed that engaging in technology and career education would increase manufacturing opportunities. My study provided the educational capital to identify the need for developing a new joint manufacturing and research career-educated specialist, called the certified manufacturing practitioner (CMP).

The CMP concept simplifies the means to link the past, the present and the future by developing business solutions from shared leaders’ experiences in the manufacturing industries. The new certified manufacturing practitioner program is designed to improve knowledge sharing through case study evaluation that is grounded in where the manufacturing jobs reside. This shared education understanding takes the manufacturing case study out of the university classroom to the manufacturing shop floor. Career-guided steps are necessary to prevent further degradation of the manufacturing knowledge base. Historical literature provides the means to improve the U.S. manufacturing industry’s productivity and competitiveness through past and present case studies. Learning from history can improve the future. Business and manufacturing case studies provide real-life stories of successes and failures in the same industry and should be the basis for knowledge sharing. Students can best obtain and share this knowledge when the career education community is committed to rolling up its sleeves to deliver hands-on career education experience directly from the U.S. manufacturing source: the manufacturing shop floor.

The problem today is that business-manufacturing case studies do not receive adequate attention. It is difficult for a manufacturing business to be competitive in today’s volatile business market without having the means to review, understand, and benefit from experience. Not learning from the past creates a communication disconnect and knowledge loss, which has a direct link to lost manufacturing businesses and jobs. In manufacturing, when learning stems from past successes and mistakes, business efficiency, and competitiveness naturally follow, because an understanding of the past reduces the risk of repeating the same mistake – or, even worse, not learning from or sharing success stories. Success is dependent on the ability to develop and identify manufacturing solutions from case studies. This ability also can provide a heads-up display for market changes, diversity of markets and the ability to adapt to markets with a historical customer perspective that is practitioner-based.

A CMP practitioner can fuel progressive learning across corporate cultures and different leadership styles, and he or she could have the influence to build upon strong team-based relationships that share knowledge. The cost of waiting for old ideas to catch up with modern-day manufacturing practices obstructs new manufacturing market opportunities. Such obstructions represent a stream of wasteful manufacturing practices, making it difficult to be competitive in today’s volatile manufacturing markets. The loss of competitiveness results in lost manufacturing work and higher unemployment statistics. Once people become unemployed, 44 percent remain unemployed for 27 weeks or more, as reported by the Congressional Budget Office. CMP becomes the natural bridge by forming sustainable manufacturing solutions based on experiences, while at the same time observing market changes that provide the means to respond, adapt and capitalize on this market change. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of employees becomes important to rediscovering the company’s value.

CMP career college partnerships work with U.S. manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. Today, the manufacturing industry knowledge base is limited to real-time events that occur daily in the manufacturing industry. The CMP embraces a holistic and unified approach in career education study connected to the manufacturing shop floor, and it creates the means to retain and share manufacturing knowledge.

Imagine the education possibilities when the career college community reshapes the U.S. and global manufacturing industry. So, is the career college community ready to take CMP from a research study concept to a successful manufacturing reality? I think so.   Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo 

Originally published: Career College Central Magazine, May/June 2014

http://www.careercollegecentral.com/pdf/CCC_May_2014.pdf


Profit or Not?

profit-or-not

If you can’t beat them, join them. The solution, or perhaps at least a smart business strategy, is to convert from the for-profit sector to the nonprofit sector.

 In an era of increased regulation and speculation, some career colleges have made the jump to nonprofit status. So, is it nobler to be profit or not-for-profit? That is the question only you can answer.

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, March 2015  page 28.

This idea causes me to become a little … irrational. Regardless of which flavor institution you might be, forprofit or nonprofit, at the end of the day you have to make more money than you spend in order to stay in business. The more money is called profit, and our modern political society has deemed it the new four-letter word. (Yes, I know profit has five letters, but this is my article and four letters is rational in my irrational world.) In the late 1970s, the federal government began a campaign to encourage equal access to higher education by creating regulations to make college loans accessible to more students. What next occurred in higher education is the business concept called supply and demand. Institutions from both sides of the for-profit/nonprofit aisle could now raise tuition, because more lenders were willing to lend money to more students. A golden business practice for creating more revenue is to raise prices at a time when customers are having no difficulty buying products and services at current prices. So when more money becomes available at current tuition prices – raise tuition. That is exactly what the for-profits and nonprofits did. When the tuition bubble visibly broke around 2011, the nonprofits felt the first sting. The wider availability of higher education to every student did not produce lower tuition costs. Imagine that: The higher-education industry has a strong capitalist business mindset.

When the tuition bubble visibly broke around 2011, the nonprofits felt the first sting. The wider availability of higher education to every student did not produce lower tuition costs. Imagine that: The higher-education industry has a strong capitalist business mindset.

The money problems quickly began to unfold. The states were the first to pull back funding. In 2011-12, college appropriations were reduced by 7.6 percent, the largest recorded decline in a half century, according to William Elliott, Melinda Lewis, Michal Grinstein- Weiss and IlSung Nam in their article “Student Loan Debt: Can Parental College Savings Help?” In 2010, the Obama administration, seeing the potential impact of the grumbling that was occurring in the states, attempted to reduce the effects of the anticipated state funding cuts by releasing the highly controversial Gainful
Employment Rule (GER) and a strategy to overshadow the effects of the easy money from the 1970s that resulted in higher tuition costs.

The Gainful Employment Rule was designed to create career colleges and training programs that could better prepare students for gainful employment – a great idea, but one that did not materialize. What happened instead was that the U.S. Department of Education decided to track the relationship between the debt students sustained and their earned incomes after graduation, as well as their rate of student loan repayment.

A catch-22 is an unreliable situation from which an individual cannot escape because of contradictory rules. By this definition, the GER is a catch-22. Under it, if a higher-education program graduates a large number of students with high debt-to-income ratios, that program may become ineligible for participation in federal student funding. Yet this higher-education debt-to-income ratio requirement is unfair.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) comprises nearly 1,200 two-year colleges, according to the AACC. Many of the students at these colleges are part-time students working full time or full-time students working part time. Many of these students’ employers provide education benefits that significantly offset the student’s tuition costs. Because of this, the ratio between the level of debt these students sustain and their earning incomes after graduation is spectacular. The rate of student loan repayment is equally spectacular for only a fraction of the for-profit community.

The nonprofit public sector was measured by the U.S. Department of Education to be twice as good as the for-profit private sector. I would hope so, because in reality, the nonprofits and for-profits are in two different leagues. The metric itself is out of control and would not pass under any real scientific scrutiny, but again, this is government and politics. It is like the joke about the job-seeking accountant: Two plus two equals whatever you want it to. But the reality is that whoever owns and controls the metric manages the results, and the for-profits receive less-favorable marks in the higher-education catch-22.

The economy has been in decline, and institutions of higher learning are indeed businesses. Now with a decline in public institution enrollment and fighting for market share, the government comes to the rescue with the GER. Don’t take it personally – it’s just business mixed with politics. Further fueling the drama, college tuitions are still trending up, lenders are
lending less, and declining family incomes are making even less money available for students attempting to enroll today.

Now we have the perfect storm in higher education, including the decay of the purchasing power of financial aid. Again from the Elliott article, just 10 short years ago, the maximum allowable Pell Grant covered 98 percent of the average tuition and fees at public fouryear institutions; in the 2012-13 academic year, this figure dropped to 64 percent. All we really know is that the current system of debt-to-income measurement does not match reality, because again, nonprofit and for-profit institutions are not in the same league.

Even so, the metrics are driving change, and the GER holds for-profit programs to a higher standard than nonprofit programs. The U.S. Department of Education’s own performance data indicates that the average debt-to-earnings ratio for all Bachelor’s degree graduates in their first year of repayment is 13 percent, versus 12 to 16 percent for nonprofits. Yet under the GER, for-profit colleges and universities would be held to an 8 percent standard. Why the different standards? The Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities (APSCU) challenged the GER on exactly that issue, and the court agreed, throwing out the rule. In its comments, APSCU cited the U.S. Department of Education’s use of “misleading” statistics in formulating the rule, including the claim that 72 percent of for-profit college graduates earn less than high-school dropouts. This casts doubt on the U.S. Department of Education’s neutrality. In my opinion, there is no conspiracy theory here; it is simply an example of the manner in which the government conducts business – nonsensically
and inefficiently, all while creating regulations that keep it in the regulation-creating business.

If you can’t beat them, join them. The solution, or perhaps at least a smart business strategy, is to convert from the for-profit sector to the nonprofit sector.

Rupert Murdoch said, “The world is changing very fast. Big will not beat small anymore. It will be the fast beating the slow.” Our for-profit private sector understands moving fast to market, and fast is the countermeasure that negates the catch-22 every time.

by AMERICAN WRITER
Dr. Pietro Savo © 2015


Getting the “right people on the bus” philosophy is the wrong philosophy

schoolbus

How disappointing history is, business solutions to improving the United States business economy industry has not changed in a hundred years. Back in the early 1900s and 1800s the United States went through a similar economic downturn. The root cause was simple, we failed to keep up with technology, and we failed to preserve an educated workforce.
We also have lost sight of the markets, combined with a lack of market aggressiveness; we began importing more than we exported which in turn created a devastating imbalance in trade. The historical research to support these statements is simple for anyone to conduct using Google. Therefore, the disappointment comes about from our lack of learning from our past, it appears we wasted all this relevant knowledge and are reinventing the wrong wheel.

We have become so focused on getting the “right people on the bus” that we’ve destroyed morale. We as a society have created a negative bearing for employee integrity because the “right people on the bus” mind-set clearly means everyone is just a number. Getting the “right people on the bus” philosophy is the wrong philosophy, because most firms can’t afford to be getting rid of people to make room for the perceived right person. The people left behind become negatively affected by this practice. These people left behind subconsciously fail to thrive, always followed by a succession of updated resumes going out in all directions. Even the top performers now left with a feeling of despair; this is a natural human behavior that adversely affects employee loyalty and performance.

This means, having the “right people on the bus” is not enough: getting the people in the right seat is of greater importance. You can do this by building positive relationships, identifying and focusing on people’s strengths, and exploiting these strengths in a way that everyone wins, and everyone benefits!

by AMERICAN WRITER
Pietro Savo © 2015

“right people on the bus” from Collins, J. (2001). Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t. New York: HarperCollins.


The Marketability Correlation – How a student’s marketability correlates with Career Colleges!

ThinkEducation

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, March 2012 addition page 36.

Today, higher education choices are numerous. What is important to understand is that education is power, regardless of where you earn it. Some higher education institutions provide greater opportunities to transform an education into jobs that pay well. As a student, it becomes equally important to bridge the gap between education and the job market by making yourself marketable. “Hard Times – College Majors, Unemployment and Earnings: Not All College Degrees are Created Equal,” a 2012 study published at Georgetown University, concluded that unemployment for students with a college or university degree is a tolerable 8.9 percent per today’s standards. It’s a disastrous 22.9 percent for job searchers with only a high school diploma and an inconceivable 31.5 percent for high school dropouts according to the Georgetown study. Marketability correlates to higher education since those with education have significantly greater employment opportunities.

Marketability is more than a fancy word; it is a place in time that waits for no one. Marketability is a lifestyle necessity.

The American people’s survival skills began in our colonial days. We are a force to reckon with when it involves our freedom, our families, our religion and our education. Education is a power that affects every aspect of our American heritage.

Investment Weekly News reported in 2011 that career colleges have a proven record of preparing students for careers. Career colleges graduate 58 percent of their students. Career colleges develop programs that prepare and then place students in 17 of the 20 fastest-growing fields in America. Another interesting statistic from the Investment Weekly News article is that career college graduates represent 42 percent of health degrees and certificates conferred at two-year and less-than-two-year institutions. Comparing higher education to employment opportunities, the “Hard Times” report found that unemployment rates for graduates in healthcare and education are 5.4 percent compared to 9.4 percent for students who majored in liberal arts.

A focused education designed to fill a niche in the service and product delivering domains begins with having no education boundaries at all. Career colleges are businesses that can positively affect the job creation market in two areas: higher education jobs and jobs that are not limited to those with a formal education, but instead require experience.

Our American society has demonstrated for more than 200 years that adaptable survival skills result in duplicable, successful results. Clearly, our economy is far from recovered; however, Investment Weekly News reports that career colleges’ strategic education initiatives will continue to prepare students for the workforce without massing enormous debt. Education should be a lifetime of benefits – not a lifetime of paying for these benefits.

Students today are bridging the gap between education and getting a job. This journey results in marketability. Marketability has become the natural countermeasure against the recessionary dive our economy experienced. This countermeasure delivers endless opportunities to test the true American survival skills in all of us. Education is Power & a Job!

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, March 2012 addition page 36.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo © 2015

Business

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


The Charter School Model

January 2015 Edition

Charter schools serve as inspiration for colleges seeking more accountability, student-centered approaches and enhanced education delivery

Career College Central Magazine, Jan/Feb 2014

In the United States, there are many options for K-12 education: charter schools, private schools, magnet schools, vouchers, tuition tax credits, home schooling and simply moving your family to a new local public school district. Parents will drive the necessary change to ensure their children are prepared for the unlimited world ahead of them, and in response, public school education is evolving. The change is charter schools. As Career College Central takes a look at higher education in 2015 and beyond, I felt it was important to review the latest developments with charter schools since they are the ideal representation of schools acting to enhance accountability, student-centered approaches and education delivery – all while operating with a for-profit business model. This change is coming at a fantastic and inspirational time in our history. The traditional kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12) system is today under attack for being expensive and poorly preparing our children for either college or a career. The United States traditional public education system has become overly focused on the element of accountability at the expense of progress, and our children are not prepared for the world outside of K-12.

Charter schools function on a for-profit mindset with an entrepreneurial approach. In many cases, charter schools operate on about two-thirds of the average funding for a child in a traditional public school.

We champion an accountability-only emphasis on setting targets, yet we do not commit to developing educational systems to ensure our children can meet these targets. The problem is we as a nation have been spending about 85 percent more on public education since 1970, according to Education Week’s cover story, “Charter Schools Grab Rural Toehold.” Common sense tells us the more we spend on public education the better the education should be, and therefore the more prepared our children should be for what comes next in their lives. But it depends who is telling the story. For the most part, school spending between rich and poor school districts across our nation has been balanced over the last 30 years. You can argue that it has not been equally, as the poorer school districts have seen per student spending rise faster than that of the richer school districts. Those poor school districts that have the greater need received the additional money. Yet, both poor and rich school districts have all ended near the same 85 percent increase in spending since 1970, according to the report in Education Week. Education is the greatest expenditure for most towns and clearly an area where cost efficiency is needed. It is no secret towns are struggling to fund the highly publicized antiquated education problem.

The average funding expenditure for traditional public school education in the United States is $12,608 per student as reported by the U.S. Department of Education. The average for charter schools per student is $8,256. To put this into some context, the New Hampshire Department of Education reports the average student funding expenditure is $13,459 as compared to the average. The cost per student at a New Hampshire charter school is $5,495. In many states, funding charter schools has become their cost-saving and educational-improvement strategy. Necessity brings about change, and leading the change are charter schools. The charter school story is fueled by everyday people taking an astonishing interest and driving positive and productive change in K-12 education. Education processes are always in some form of evolutionary change. Today, more than 2.3 million students attend about 6,000 charter schools in 42 states, including the District of Columbia. The waiting list is estimated at a million students, according to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, a 13.4 percent increase from the preceding year according to Reichgott Junge’s research paper “Charter Schools Are Changing the Landscape. Education is an adaptive evolutionary process that waits for no one, and the charter school performance data is beginning to flow in. Los Angeles charter schools are outperforming charters in California and nationwide. Forty-eight percent of Los Angeles charters outperformed traditional public schools in reading and 44 percent outperformed traditional public schools in math, according to the Education Week report “Charter School Performance in Los Angeles.” In New York City charter schools, 86 percent of all students come from the lowest-income families, 95 percent are African-American or Latino, and 83 percent go to college. In 2012, 15-year-olds attending BASIS Tucson North, a charter school in Arizona, outperformed every country in the world. In the case of many charter schools, flexibility is the key to their success. A great example is the charter school law in New Mexico that allowed a school to design student growth and evaluation plans that helped teachers, students and parents visualize education progress in real time. I asked Kate Baker, Executive Director of the Network for Educational Opportunity (NEO), a New Hampshire K-12 education scholarship organization, if charter schools could have the same funding as traditional K-12 public schools, what would our community’s return on investment be? “I’m thinking about your ROI question from 50,000 feet. In the long run, I expect innovation in education, like at Polaris Charter School of Manchester, New Hampshire, where the curriculum is student-centered and they are utilizing technology and authentic supply and demand,” she said. “[There], parents and students are not trapped by their Zip code, and they have many education options. The average cost of a private elementary in New Hampshire is $6,500 per student, as compared to $13,459 for public school students in New Hampshire.”

Charter schools are designed from the ground up to be academically strong. Charter schools must be fiscally responsible or go out of business; there is no golden government parachute for charter schools. A charter school is a required and viable choice within the traditional public school system. Charter Schools offer parents a high-quality education alternative for their children who may not do as well in a traditional public school. Charter schools are more focused; embody the basics that work; offer instruction in the STEM fields; and stimulate project-based learning for all students that results in quantifiable results toward predetermined, measurable goals. Charter schools function on a for-profit mindset with an entrepreneurial approach. In many cases, charter schools operate on about two-thirds of the average funding for a child in a traditional public school.

The for-profit educational management organizations (EMOs) are developing education miracles in public education and are a fundamental part of charter school transformation across our nation. Miracles” by better preparing our children for the future in an education environment where the normality is spending more on public education and getting less. My research identified that charter schools operated by for-profit models take on a more entrepreneurial approach while providing a higher quality K-12 education. The charter school movement is one of the most efficient self-organizing education models in modern history. An educational efficiency endowed by social-entrepreneurs who refuse to accept the failures of K-12 education – failures that traditional public education shows no capacity to solve.

The charter school advantage

  • Charter schools draw on partnerships within the community to provide services to students.
  • Charter schools support underserved communities.
  • Charter schools drive education innovation.
  • Charter schools reduce bureaucracy.
  • Charter schools promote transparency between the students, teachers and parents involved.
  • Charter schools’ “duty” or “obligation” is equally distributed between students, teachers and parents.

In the charter school world, the greatest advantage is that modern, innovative education revolves around knowledge that students, teachers and parents learn through experience. Perhaps traditional education is evolving to better simulate the spontaneous adaptive nature of the human community it serves. These experiences become the next natural evolutionary level of education, today resulting in education success stories by the power of one inspired student at a time.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


The Next “Greatest Generation”

Career College Central Magazine, Nov/Dec2014

Career College Central Magazine, Nov/Dec 2014

Modern American higher education is not ready for the next Greatest Generation. We as educators cannot hope to reach a point of readiness unless we engage today in measured, strategic, deliberate action. All ideas are important; both passionate rhetoric and factual articles can inspire and motivate. Yet, this is not enough. Pivotal action, channeled by
clear goals, and an unrelenting pledge are required to capture the promise of tomorrow. America’s future is represented by the raw talent of the military community returning from war – our next Greatest Generation landing on our campuses nationwide and in large numbers. I could not write this article until I understood what defines the Greatest Generation – perhaps a generation that survived the Depression and World War II, perhaps a generation of young people who had their life’s plans put on hold when they marched off to war. President Franklin D. Roosevelt said of those who were growing up between the Great Depression and World War II: “This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny.” As we have witnessed, the millennium delivered this challenge again on Sept. 11, 2001, by a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks launched upon the United States.

This generation once again has earned the distinction of the Greatest Generation. They are creating a future by overcoming the same challenges their earlier brothers and sisters met.

 9/11 took on new meaning that is recognizable worldwide. The millennium’s challenges were not finished
on 9/11. Our nation witnessed the beginning of economic collapse on Sept. 8, 2008, when the U.S. Treasury seized control of mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The effects of the economic downfalls and high unemployment are
still felt today. The war in Afghanistan and the Gulf Wars have brought about a large number of war veterans returning home to a grateful country. This generation once again has earned the distinction of the Greatest Generation. They are creating a future by overcoming the same challenges their earlier brothers and sisters met. You see, we never learn from history, but history has learned to repeat itself. Speaking at the Empowering Our Nation’s Warriors Summit in February 2014, President George W. Bush said, “Since 9/11, more than 2.5 million Americans have worn the uniform. They have faced down our enemies, they’ve liberated millions, and in so doing showed the true compassion of a great Nation. They are the 1 percent of America who kept the 99 percent safe. And we owe them, and their families, a deep debt of gratitude.” The true
one-percenters are entering our nation’s career colleges with a pocket full of veteran education benefits they earned in a way most academics can’t possibly understand or imagine. However, I assure you, our next Greatest Generation is
enrolling and planning on using their earned veteran education benefits. Our obligation is much bigger than enrolling these veterans in our schools; our obligation to the next Greatest Generation is to make sure they experience the most amazing higher education possible.

How can we do this?

  • By listening first to what education
    opportunities sincerely excite our millennium veterans. Stop the
    build-it-and-they-will come mindset; if your education practice is all about
    filling seats, then you will fail, and you are not focused on the “deep debt
    of gratitude” that President Bush spoke about.
  • By listening first, then developing courses
    that meet their needs, fulfill their dreams, and promote their future career
    and employment opportunities. Our millennium veterans are more than
    fulfilling higher education market share; their academic prosperity equals
    freedom itself.
  • By listening first and taking notice that the
    next Greatest Generation is here protecting our nation’s freedom once again,
    day after day.
  • By sincerely understanding what this
    generation represents: a brotherhood and sisterhood that spans the entire
    history of our great nation.

Modern American higher education is not ready for the next Greatest Generation. We need to be – and need to be
intelligently. History has defined the next Greatest Generation once again: this generation also had no choice, and they have accepted the challenge and delivered priceless returns to every American. We owe this next Greatest Generation a deep debt of gratitude. We must listen first with open ears and hearts before we enroll them, and then passionately develop education programs that meet their needs, relying on their viewpoint rather than our own.

On Veterans Day, never lose sight that these millennium veterans, a brotherhood and sisterhood that span the entire history of our great nation, are the next Greatest Generation.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


Succeeding on a New Front

Succeeding on a New Front – Going back to college is yet another brave act for Iraq and Afghanistan-era veterans who are finding challenges unique to them on college campuses.
September 2014 Edition

Career College Central Magazine, September 2014

Our service members are the true 1 percent who have raised their right hand to protect us. We have an obligation to protect them as well.

Summer has come and gone, and many highly motivated veterans are looking to
spend their earned veteran education benefits, and with good reason. The unemployment statistics for Iraq- and Afghanistan-era veterans show that
education provides significant advantages. Officers with college degrees show a
lower unemployment rate than most enlisted personnel, whose unemployment rate is in the double digits. If education increases the odds of employment, then going back to college becomes the logical choice. However, many variables can
complicate the student-veteran’s enrollment and assimilation into higher
education. For example, student veterans are arriving at university and college
campuses where counselors may not be adequately prepared for them. Even with so many veterans ready and willing to spend their education money, some schools are not yet ready to support these veterans’ educational needs. This is a shame, as there is a huge benefit to enrolling veterans, who often come academically prepared and have high educational goals – a winning combination for institutions of higher education.

Student veterans are arriving at university and college campuses where counselors may not be adequately prepared for them.

For many veterans, social class plays a large role in their interest in enrolling in
college. A 2007 Associated Press report showed that the majority of veterans
killed in Iraq came from towns having a per capita income well below the
national average, and more than half came from towns where the percentage of
people living in poverty topped the national average. This points to a lower
socioeconomic status in general for men and women entering the military. And a
major key to rising from a lower socioeconomic class is higher education.


Which higher education programs have the greatest employment opportunities for veterans and their families? My research has identified the health service
industry as a top employer, second only to the federal government. From 2004 to 2014, three agencies – the Department of Defense (DOD) the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) – accounted for about 94 percent of hiring increases. The DOD
reported that military-to-civilian transitions have greatly contributed to this
overall increase. In keeping with these facts, many veterans are currently enrolling in education programs designed to staff these particular industries.
I recently decided to research institutions possessing qualities especially suited to the student-veteran. I chose to search for regionally accredited colleges that boast lower tuition, have both on-campus and online degree programs, offer personalized instruction, are military-friendly, and provide access to student internships or co-ops (which can turn the educational experience
into a great-paying job). Thanks to the unlimited power of the Internet, I
quickly found several institutions that fit this description, including Daniel
Webster College in Nashua, New Hampshire; Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond, Kentucky; and National University in Bakersfield, California. I’ll close with a heads up to America’s 4,599 Title IV degree granting institutions.
The veterans and their families are coming, armed with the sheer power of
curiosity and the information-gathering muscle of the Internet, and when they
ask a question, they probably already know the answer. Veterans understand that
the best strategy to ensure that their higher education results in a good career is to self-advocate. Veterans come military-educated, leadership-ready, mature and eager to learn – and they will succeed.

Suggestions for institutions:

• Familiarize yourself with VA education benefit programs and become a real help to student veterans.

• Don’t spend huge marketing dollars; instead, use this money to reduce tuition costs.

• Don’t enroll or sell your seats; simply provide counsel.

• Try to provide student-veterans with what they are looking for. If you
don’t have it, direct them to one of the other 4,598 Title IV degree-granting
institutions in the United States that may.

• Take the time to learn what drives a student’s passion. This will improve retention and graduation rates.

• Place quality of education before revenue and profit.

Our service members are the true 1 percent who have raised their right hand to protect us. We have an obligation to protect them as well.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


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