Monthly Archives: November 2010

Never Stop Rediscovering!

Originally Published April 11, 2009; rewritten March 13, 2010Pietro Savo

Today small businesses are struggling and surrounded by economic doom and gloom, and business growth and business survival is critical to our entire nation’s economy. Today as consumers, we import more than we export and job loss from this strategy has created economic devastation that affects the entire United States. It appears that our economic strategists have forgotten to leave the world better than they find it; instead, they choose to get rich, at such an overwhelming cost to the rest of us. You cannot help wonder what has become the primary teaching in the top business schools, perhaps “Gluttony 501!”

In a devastating economy, developing renewed business success is critically dependent on cultural adaptability. Cultural adaptability is a rediscovering process critical to the survival of any business. Business complacency is an example of untrue leadership or non-leadership, any company that becomes complacent is certain to fail.

The markets will continue to evolve, and the amount of market change is unknown; what is clear is that “The Markets Drive the Business” and business resiliency are vital to capture this market change. Rediscovering business success and having the right people on the bus is not enough, more important is having the right people in the right seat; this is a never-ending rediscovering process.

All the books that have been written about the rediscovering process can be summed up into one rule; “Rediscover, rediscover often, and never stop rediscovering your business”. Businesses managed by this rule create success in all directions, is fun to work at, have the very high morale and low employee turnover, and rediscovering is the spirit of success!

Self is influenced by rediscovery, the natural by-product becomes amazing possibilities, resulting in sustainable success!

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American Hope

Sarah

The Sarah Palin story is an inspiring political story, because she comes from our middle class American surroundings. Her life could represent our American story, her middle-class beginnings, and a revolutionary process from growing up in the United States. To mayor of an Alaskan town and finally becoming the governor of Alaska, her middle class journey is representative of what our founding fathers dreamed as the American dream worth fighting for. Sarah Palin’s revolutionary process has captured the hearts, the minds, and the dreams of every American person in our great nation. What change she brings to the political environment, is a change of fresh air, a change of American hope, and a change that people can understand.


A theatrical life of middle class beginnings much like those of Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, Richard Nixon, and Lyndon Johnson all endured tough financial times growing up in America. These presidents living one day at a time, their dreams and helped create the America we believe in today. Leadership, in the limelight, always speaking the people’s message, and broadcasting to ever American the importance of governing by the people, for the people, is what America stands for. Our founding fathers dreamed of such political clarity from citizens, citizens destined to do great things for the America we love.


We do not know whether Sarah Palin will be the next president of the United States. What we do know is that a mother’s love for her nation is the most powerful force in the universe, and no inept political machine in the United States can slow that down.

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Our Founding Fathers Created A Dream

DREAM

Our Founding Fathers created a dream. The dream is a country where hard work, dedication to family, dedication to a country means something special. Our Founding Fathers created a dream; over 200 years ago before any preconceived notion could have formed about the importance of this dream. Preconceived convictions that society must govern itself, that leadership should not be monarchs by birth. That leadership voted into office by the people, represents true leadership in a self-govern society.

The people who select their leaders, to represent them, to represent the desires of society to grow, learn, and be self-satisfied with the world around it. Not reaching complacency, but establishing a rewarding life in a nation’s domain. These selected leaders become the left and right arm of those who put them in office. We the People, our nation’s modern day descendants of the Founding Fathers, in the truest sense, a nation of immigrants still creating American dreams.

We are witnessing these dreams at the speed of technology in real-time, the first modern emergence is The Tea Party, simply the tip of the iceberg of change, proof that the founding Father’s dreams are still alive-and-kicking today.

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Political Battle

American Writer

WE find ourselves in a political battle the elitist who created it, can only win. Winning in a manner determined to feed their egos with no regard for the wishes of the PEOPLE! Whatever happened to “WE THE PEOPLE”?

Today the elitist believe that WE cannot make sound decisions without their meddling. WE are descendants of explorers who have traveled across great oceans for FREEDOM. We are descendants of pioneers who ventured out into the vast wilderness for FREEDOM. WE THE PEOPLE able to adapt and live in any environment on earth, yet today our elected politicians create laws that make us helpless!

WE THE PEOPLE are strong and willing once again to earn our FREEDOM, for FREEDOM is the real meaning of WE THE PEOPLE ARE STRONG!

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High Unemployment

Pietro Savo

The United States’ poor economy, and high unemployment resulted from a combination of not invest in manufacturing, design research, human education, and government policy changes such as Free trade agreements (FTAs). Currently there are FTAs with 15 countries. Australia, Bahrain, CAFTA-DR, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, NAFTA, Nicaragua Oman, Peru, and Singapore (“Free Trade Agreements “, 2010). One FTA in particular had a monumental effect on jobs in the United States. The North American Free Trade Agreement accredited for 1.1 million manufacturing jobs lost over the first 3 1/2 years (Prizinsky, 1997).

The total number of people in the United States who lost their jobs from March 2001 to October 2003 was 2,400,000 (“NAFTA Turns Ten 1994-2004 “, 2004). The 2,400,000 lost jobs are those that left the United States shores completely, what also accounts for the high United States un-employment is the 24 million Mexican immigrants willing to work for a fraction of United States citizen wages. NAFTA opened up the borders with Mexico, some 24 million immigrants live in the United States today either as citizens, and it is estimated the 12 million immigrants are un-documented. The former Mexican president Vicente Fox reported that in 2005 Mexican citizens working in the United States sent back $18 billion, the World Bank estimates that in 2006 that figure reached well over $25 billion (Bacon, 2008). That explains why today the attention and emotional connection are on NAFTA, with the reported job loss data and staggering un-employment rate witnessed today; this also contributes to organizations not having the money to invest in new technology, equipment, design, and development and employee education. Such lessons from history, resulting in economic perils associated with not investing in manufacturing, design research, and human education.

The industrial foreign trade policy that attempted to balance the trade between Mexico, Canada and the United States, clearly had a greater negative effect on the United States workforce that policy makers predicted (Prizinsky, 1997). Robert Scott (2001) writing for the Economic Policy Institute addresses why NAFTA core principles better supported the 50 years of the strategic industrial growth policies of Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, and China than the industrial growth policies of the United States. The Asian model, of simply protected their industries; Asia invest heavily in manufacturing process research, and employee education, and subsidize R&D investment (Scott, 2001). This strategy represented the complete opposite of what occurred in the United States as the result of NAFTA (Scott, 2001).

The United States has failed to learn lessons from their past; they did not protect their manufacturing industries and consequently important knowledge and good paying jobs are lost.

References

Bacon, D. (2008). Displaced People: NAFTA’s Most Important Product. NACLA Report on the Americas, 23-27.

Free Trade Agreements (Publication. (2010). from International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce:

NAFTA Turns Ten 1994-2004 (2004). NACLA Report on the Americas, 37(4), 6-39.

Prizinsky, D. (1997). “NAFTA levels a soft blow to Ohio jobs so far.” Crain’s Cleveland Business. Crain Communications, Inc. 1997. Retrieved June 21, 2010 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-50355528.html.

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Manufacturing History Does Repeat Itself

American Writer CMP

History does repeat itself, Charles Babbage profound insight was ignored by Great Britain in the 1830’s. Great Britain did not invest in manufacturing and design research and human education as their emerging economic rivals, the United States and Germany did (Dickson, 1996). Great Britain wasted its progressive knowledge and lost its global market superiority. This historic failure occurred in two areas, first, Great Britain failed to remember history, and second the United States manufacturing industry allowed Great Britain’s negative experience to occur here in the United States.

Combine this history lesson with the negative effects of NAFTA (Prizinsky, 1997), the industrial foreign trade policy that attempted to balance the trade between Mexico, Canada and the United States. Robert Scott (2001) writing for the Economic Policy Institute addresses why NAFTA core principles better supported the 50 years of the strategic industrial growth policies of Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, and China than the industrial growth policies of the United States. In this Asian model, the mentioned countries protected their industries; they invest heavily in manufacturing process research and employee education, and subsidize R&D investment (Scott, 2001). This strategy represented the complete opposite of what occurred in the United States as the result of NAFTA (Scott, 2001). In Samir Gibrara’s (1998) article, called "Pitfalls, potholes, and acceleration for the global future," the practice of driving into the same pothole day after day defines how the how the U.S. manufacturing industry has failed to learn from their mistakes (Gibara, 1998). Much the same lessons learned, as a daily commute to work after a harsh New England winter. The commuter learns to avoid the displaced pavement and potholes created from months of frost. Commuter anger occurs when driving into the same pothole, only to remember it was there after the automobile tire damaged beyond repair, and repairing the potholes after numerous commuter complaints.

A sustainable solution to further reduction in the U.S. manufacturing industry is documenting and sharing best practices throughout the U. S. Business and Manufacturing Industries. As the concept of a globalization gains acceptance and momentum, the future will have an occasional downturns. Our challenge is to avoid creating additional problems and focus on the intended goals.

Employment also has a very important global element that now challenges the manufacturing sector (Colvin, 2008). The global labor market has become strong elsewhere in the global economy because of wasteful spending by the United States. Wasteful spending strategy has empowered millions of people around the world to compete for millions of United States jobs.

References
Colvin, G. (2008). A Recession of Global Dimensions. Fortune 157 (2), 19.
Dickson, P., Czinkota,M. (1996). How the United States can be number one again: resurrecting the industrial policy debate. The Columbia Journal of World Business Fall 96(31), 76-87.
Gibara, S. (1998). Pitfalls, potholes, and acceleration for the global future. Area Development Site and Facility Planning, 4(12), 4.
Prizinsky, D. (1997). "NAFTA levels a soft blow to Ohio jobs so far." Crain’s Cleveland Business. Crain Communications, Inc. 1997. Retrieved June 21, 2010 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-50355528.html.
Scott, R. E. (2001). Fast Track to Lost Jobs: Trade Deficits and Manufacturing Decline Are the Legacies of NAFTA and the WTO. Briefing Paper. Washington, D.C.: Economic Policy Institute.

 

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