Monthly Archives: August 2012

Transitioning American Veterans

Dr. Pietro Savo American WriterWe find ourselves challenged to support the strengths and needs of veterans as they transition from a military life to pursuing higher education. This challenge finds its home well within the framework of Schlossberg’s transition model, which was developed to assist with a broad range of life transitions. Many institutions of higher education have developed detailed service programs to boost veteran success in higher education.

What’s missing, and perhaps a barrier for success, is that the key to these programs lies in understanding the student-veteran mindset, which is becoming critical as more student-veterans seek to use their military education benefits.

The 2011 NACADA Journal article “Applying Schlossberg’s Model to Transitioning American Veterans” reports that an increasing number of student-veterans start the higher education journey with unseen injuries such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues. These unseen injuries increase the likelihood of lower retention and graduation rates. Student-veterans returning to colleges and universities typically have a higher level of education and a higher level of maturity than the traditional high school graduate because they have a more diverse experience base. This experience base can be an additional barrier that adds to the difficulty of understanding the student-veteran mindset.

Dr. Schlossberg’s study identified the means to overcome such a difficulty by a process that encourages an understanding of the student-veteran’s strengths, needs and challenges as they transition from the military life to the higher education journey.

We Speak A Different Language

Student-veterans are different. We take on life’s tasks as if they represent a mission. We are regimented, task-oriented and focused on the goals. We speak a different language that is easily distinguishable from one veteran to another. We communicate with experience gained from places and events that are both amazing and impossible to describe. 

It’s a language that cannot be learned; it can only be earned. It defines our history and the level of trust granted.

Schlossberg’s Transition Model

Schlossberg’s transition model focuses on a series of human interactions that produce a desired result as a means to promote higher education success.

Schlossberg model promote dynamic change that influences the sense of competency which becomes a clear connection between a student-veteran and an institution of higher education. A connection when applied, results in higher retention, degree completion rates and a productive, transitioning American veteran.

About Dr. Nancy K. Schlossberg

Dr. Nancy K. Schlossberg established the Office of Women in Higher Education at the American Council of Education, and she has served on the faculties of Wayne State University, Howard University and Pratt University. Her published books include: Getting the Most out of College (2001); Going to Plan B: How You Can Cope, Regroup and Start Your Life on a New Path (1996); Improving Higher Education Environments for Adults (1989); Counseling Adults in Transition (1984); and Perspectives on Counseling Adults (1978).

Download and read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, July 2012 addition page 50

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

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American Writer a Positive Thinking Movement by Dr. Pietro Savo

Dr. Pietro Savo

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Manufacturing Hands On Knowledge

Dr. Pietro Savo American Writer

Historically, the manufacturing workforce was often composed of family members who had worked for generations at the same plant. The sharing of manufacturing knowledge occurred at the supper table. In addition, skilled workers rose through the ranks and held management positions thereby expanding the knowledge beyond the family. In this way, manufacturing knowledge continued to grow through the sharing of ideas.

As competition increased and methodologies changed, the required skill set changed. Remaining competitive meant hiring managers with college generated business skills and little or no hands-on manufacturing experience. These highly educated and poorly experienced leaders began encouraging the older manufacturing generation to retire, or simply downsized them altogether (Polzin 2007, p. 38). This meant a continued loss of historical and hands on knowledge over the last 50 years. In 1950, the United States manufacturing industry was about 35% of total employment. In 2004, this number dropped to only 13%, and in 2010, the number was only 5.95% (Fisher, 2004). These changes made learning from the past difficult at best.

With this critical talent experience base now gone, organizations no longer have the wisdom of capturing or documenting the experience and knowledge from seasoned experts (Polzin, 2007). When the generation of experts left, the intellectual knowledge did as well. Our global economy depends on manufacturing, which implies the need of selecting an endurable means to sustain growth of the manufacturing industry.

Solutions will come from understanding the tested wisdom of those who have retained the hands-on knowledge and seasoned enough to share this skillset with managers with college generated business skills. This manager will need to swallow some pride and begin to learn how to once again capture the manufacturing greatness that once personified the United States manufacturing industry. Never too late to recapture this skill set, simply decide to do so, and then do it!

Source:

Fisher, E. (2004). Why are we losing manufacturing jobs? Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Economic Commentary, July, 6.

Polzin, M. J. (2007). The disposable American: Layoffs and their consequences/communities and workforce development. Labor Studies Journal, 31(4), 93-95.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

American Writer a Positive Thinking Movement by Dr. Pietro Savo

Dr. Pietro Savo

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