Tag Archives: Dr. Pietro Savo

Manufacturing Success-Evolving to adapt to changes in the manufacturing industry

Manufacturing Success

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. How can we rejuvenate it? And how would career colleges benefit from a manufacturing renaissance?

Manufacturing Success

By Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. Both print and online media document new automated technology and outline the lack of competitive advantage to improve operational efficiency. This inefficiency led to many manufacturing plants closing and a climbing unemployment rate. The result is a loss of U.S. manufacturing knowledge and manufacturing jobs. Historically, the manufacturing workforce was often composed of family members who had worked for generations at the same plant. The sharing of manufacturing knowledge occurred at the dinner table. In addition, skilled workers rose through the ranks and held management positions, thereby expanding the knowledge beyond the family. In this way, manufacturing knowledge continued to grow through the sharing of ideas.

As competition increased and methodologies changed, the required skill set changed. Remaining competitive meant hiring managers with university-generated business skills and little or no hand-on manufacturing experience. These highly educated and poorly experienced leaders began encouraging the older manufacturing generation to retire – or simply downsized them altogether. This meant a continued loss of historical and hands-on knowledge over the last 50 years. In 1950, manufacturing was about 35 percent of total employment. In 2004, this number dropped to only 13 percent, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland economic commentary “Why Are We Losing Manufacturing Jobs?” In 2014, the number was only 6.6 percent. These changes made learning from the past difficult at best.

I began to write this article over 30 years ago when I was a production manufacturing worker at Sikorsky Aircraft. I witnessed the jobs leaving firsthand. Thirty years later while conducting research for my doctoral dissertation, I discovered that the missing link to that mass exodus of jobs was the devastating loss of manufacturing knowledge. This discovery prompted the need to create a potential solution rooted in two very important U.S. industries: the career college and manufacturing communities. My research identified the career college sector as the community best equipped to support this ground-level important function in our nation.

The career college community is grounded firmly in a context that is best equipped to support the U.S. manufacturing industry, because career colleges, universities and vocational schools are closest to the workforce. Bringing well-paying manufacturing jobs back is critical to the future of our sector. The global labor market has become strong outside the U.S. because of the high labor cost stigma associated with the U.S. economy. Heightened domestic costs empowered millions of people around the world to compete for U.S. jobs. This increased global competition led to downsizing of the manufacturing sector in the U.S. Many products formerly manufactured in the U.S. are now manufactured in part or in whole elsewhere in the world. U.S. companies outsourced manufacturing because the company’s leaders honestly believed American workers held no competitive advantage over cheap offshore labor. This strategy caused great devastation by halting investments in manufacturing technology and education. When companies do not have the additional capital generated from higher revenue to invest back into the business, the result is a loss of competitive advantage and shared knowledge.

The U.S. economy relies heavily on manufacturing, meaning that the sustained growth of the manufacturing industry is paramount to economic stability. The purpose of this article is to introduce the feasibility of a certification to bridge the gap between manufacturing and research in the U.S. by establishing a side-by-side value education partnership that links manufacturing industries and the career college community.

The researcher sought to understand the challenges from both a practitioner’s and researcher’s perspective. Manufacturing leaders participating in the survey for the feasibility study were from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Rolls Royce, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and United Technologies; the survey also included supply chain leaders from the U.S. government. Eighty percent of the survey respondents agreed that there is a need for a new manufacturing practitioner certification. Eighty-three percent of the survey respondents agreed that a new certified professional would improve manufacturing productivity through focused career education. Ninety-four percent of the survey respondents agreed that engaging in technology and career education would increase manufacturing opportunities. My study provided the educational capital to identify the need for developing a new joint manufacturing and research career-educated specialist, called the certified manufacturing practitioner (CMP).

The CMP concept simplifies the means to link the past, the present and the future by developing business solutions from shared leaders’ experiences in the manufacturing industries. The new certified manufacturing practitioner program is designed to improve knowledge sharing through case study evaluation that is grounded in where the manufacturing jobs reside. This shared education understanding takes the manufacturing case study out of the university classroom to the manufacturing shop floor. Career-guided steps are necessary to prevent further degradation of the manufacturing knowledge base. Historical literature provides the means to improve the U.S. manufacturing industry’s productivity and competitiveness through past and present case studies. Learning from history can improve the future. Business and manufacturing case studies provide real-life stories of successes and failures in the same industry and should be the basis for knowledge sharing. Students can best obtain and share this knowledge when the career education community is committed to rolling up its sleeves to deliver hands-on career education experience directly from the U.S. manufacturing source: the manufacturing shop floor.

The problem today is that business-manufacturing case studies do not receive adequate attention. It is difficult for a manufacturing business to be competitive in today’s volatile business market without having the means to review, understand, and benefit from experience. Not learning from the past creates a communication disconnect and knowledge loss, which has a direct link to lost manufacturing businesses and jobs. In manufacturing, when learning stems from past successes and mistakes, business efficiency, and competitiveness naturally follow, because an understanding of the past reduces the risk of repeating the same mistake – or, even worse, not learning from or sharing success stories. Success is dependent on the ability to develop and identify manufacturing solutions from case studies. This ability also can provide a heads-up display for market changes, diversity of markets and the ability to adapt to markets with a historical customer perspective that is practitioner-based.

A CMP practitioner can fuel progressive learning across corporate cultures and different leadership styles, and he or she could have the influence to build upon strong team-based relationships that share knowledge. The cost of waiting for old ideas to catch up with modern-day manufacturing practices obstructs new manufacturing market opportunities. Such obstructions represent a stream of wasteful manufacturing practices, making it difficult to be competitive in today’s volatile manufacturing markets. The loss of competitiveness results in lost manufacturing work and higher unemployment statistics. Once people become unemployed, 44 percent remain unemployed for 27 weeks or more, as reported by the Congressional Budget Office. CMP becomes the natural bridge by forming sustainable manufacturing solutions based on experiences, while at the same time observing market changes that provide the means to respond, adapt and capitalize on this market change. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of employees becomes important to rediscovering the company’s value.

CMP career college partnerships work with U.S. manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. Today, the manufacturing industry knowledge base is limited to real-time events that occur daily in the manufacturing industry. The CMP embraces a holistic and unified approach in career education study connected to the manufacturing shop floor, and it creates the means to retain and share manufacturing knowledge.

Imagine the education possibilities when the career college community reshapes the U.S. and global manufacturing industry. So, is the career college community ready to take CMP from a research study concept to a successful manufacturing reality? I think so.   Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo 

Originally published: Career College Central Magazine, May/June 2014

http://www.careercollegecentral.com/pdf/CCC_May_2014.pdf

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Succeeding on a New Front

Succeeding on a New Front – Going back to college is yet another brave act for Iraq and Afghanistan-era veterans who are finding challenges unique to them on college campuses.
September 2014 Edition

Career College Central Magazine, September 2014

Our service members are the true 1 percent who have raised their right hand to protect us. We have an obligation to protect them as well.

Summer has come and gone, and many highly motivated veterans are looking to
spend their earned veteran education benefits, and with good reason. The unemployment statistics for Iraq- and Afghanistan-era veterans show that
education provides significant advantages. Officers with college degrees show a
lower unemployment rate than most enlisted personnel, whose unemployment rate is in the double digits. If education increases the odds of employment, then going back to college becomes the logical choice. However, many variables can
complicate the student-veteran’s enrollment and assimilation into higher
education. For example, student veterans are arriving at university and college
campuses where counselors may not be adequately prepared for them. Even with so many veterans ready and willing to spend their education money, some schools are not yet ready to support these veterans’ educational needs. This is a shame, as there is a huge benefit to enrolling veterans, who often come academically prepared and have high educational goals – a winning combination for institutions of higher education.

Student veterans are arriving at university and college campuses where counselors may not be adequately prepared for them.

For many veterans, social class plays a large role in their interest in enrolling in
college. A 2007 Associated Press report showed that the majority of veterans
killed in Iraq came from towns having a per capita income well below the
national average, and more than half came from towns where the percentage of
people living in poverty topped the national average. This points to a lower
socioeconomic status in general for men and women entering the military. And a
major key to rising from a lower socioeconomic class is higher education.


Which higher education programs have the greatest employment opportunities for veterans and their families? My research has identified the health service
industry as a top employer, second only to the federal government. From 2004 to 2014, three agencies – the Department of Defense (DOD) the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) – accounted for about 94 percent of hiring increases. The DOD
reported that military-to-civilian transitions have greatly contributed to this
overall increase. In keeping with these facts, many veterans are currently enrolling in education programs designed to staff these particular industries.
I recently decided to research institutions possessing qualities especially suited to the student-veteran. I chose to search for regionally accredited colleges that boast lower tuition, have both on-campus and online degree programs, offer personalized instruction, are military-friendly, and provide access to student internships or co-ops (which can turn the educational experience
into a great-paying job). Thanks to the unlimited power of the Internet, I
quickly found several institutions that fit this description, including Daniel
Webster College in Nashua, New Hampshire; Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond, Kentucky; and National University in Bakersfield, California. I’ll close with a heads up to America’s 4,599 Title IV degree granting institutions.
The veterans and their families are coming, armed with the sheer power of
curiosity and the information-gathering muscle of the Internet, and when they
ask a question, they probably already know the answer. Veterans understand that
the best strategy to ensure that their higher education results in a good career is to self-advocate. Veterans come military-educated, leadership-ready, mature and eager to learn – and they will succeed.

Suggestions for institutions:

• Familiarize yourself with VA education benefit programs and become a real help to student veterans.

• Don’t spend huge marketing dollars; instead, use this money to reduce tuition costs.

• Don’t enroll or sell your seats; simply provide counsel.

• Try to provide student-veterans with what they are looking for. If you
don’t have it, direct them to one of the other 4,598 Title IV degree-granting
institutions in the United States that may.

• Take the time to learn what drives a student’s passion. This will improve retention and graduation rates.

• Place quality of education before revenue and profit.

Our service members are the true 1 percent who have raised their right hand to protect us. We have an obligation to protect them as well.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


“Education Is power” A power of knowledge’s, that grants freedom to live, to laugh, to learn and most important to share

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Creating a brighter future for Haiti, safe guard our #1 natural resource our people, especially our greatest legacy our children. This power comes from understanding that Education Is power – A power of knowledge’s, that grants freedom to live, to laugh, to learn and most important to share.  

Education Is Power and regardless where this education is obtained, once it’s yours, no one can take it away from you! I truly believe that our children young and old represent our #1 natural resource… and we all have the need and right to a vocation. “Creating of Brighter Future for Haiti” is the inspiration for me to, in our world there are many Haiti (s), that is why it so important to focus all our energy to this amazing Caribbean country. Haiti is the most populous full member-state of the Caribbean Community. Populous is a truly inspiring word, full of residents, jammed with people passionate people.

I believe with people all amazing goodness is possible, that knowledge has led me here today.

To transform a populous to prosperity requires a plan. Vocational and technical education is the secret sauce to improving the economic development of Haiti.  Much of what we learn has a direct correlation to the social influence of learning. Economic doom and gloom create a struggle that students of all ages experience. The struggle that keeps the next generation away from attending a vocational and technical education is the struggle that continues to reduce any chance of eliminating the economic hardships. No matter how, economic hardships keep people down, economic hardships is
avoidable.

In a challenging economy, developing renewed education success is critically dependent on cultural adaptability. Cultural adaptability is a rediscovering process critical to the survival of our humanity itself.

Haiti’s history – inventing survivability…..

Haiti’s historicaly unique for several reasons. When it gained independence in 1804, it was the first independent nation of Latin America and the Caribbean, the only nation in the world established as a result of a successful slave revolt, and the second republic in the Americas. Its successful revolution by slaves and free people of color inspired the world, that is why I believe the vocational revolution occurring in Haiti today will once again led the world.


“Education is an evolutionary market process when embraced by the populous has no limit.”  

What we know for sure, the education markets will continue to evolve, and the  amount of market change is unknown; what is clear is that “The Markets Drive the education spending, and the education spend drives our economy” and education resiliency are vital to improving our economy, and education is the best tool for re-inventing a robust economy.

When self, influenced by rediscovery, the social influence of learning sets the stage. We have some work to do, all the books that have been written about the rediscovering process can be summed up into one rule;

“Rediscover, rediscover often, and never stop rediscovering and the natural by-product becomes success!

This brings us to a level of understanding that education is a form economic power that when generated smartly results in
unlimited potential. Humanities’ DNA is programed to drive us outward to explore, to invent, and to prosper. When
society limits this outward motion regardless the reason, substandard education practices result. In my opinion, the education model that is best suited to empower our natural instinct to explore and invent is a career or vocational education.

Its concepts promote the most basic common denominator that if you teach humanity to fish, “we can survive”, “we feed ourselves”, “we can prosper”. And we can continue to explore and invent better ways to fish.

The economic effectiveness of human capital relies upon on the skills of its work force. The skills and the abilities of the work force, in turn, are dependent upon the quality of the education and training systems in place.  

Taken from the a speech I gave at the: Organization of Support to the Development of the Plateau Central, Inc.  http://osdpc.org/annual-events/2014-annual-fundraising-event/

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


StraighterLine

What We Do:

StraighterLine provides high-quality online college courses that are guaranteed to fit into your degree program.


Manufacturing Success: Evolving to adapt to change…

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Manufacturing Success: Evolving to adapt to changes in the manufacturing industry. Career College Central Magazine, May 2014

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. Both print and online media document new automated technology and outline the lack of competitive advantage to improve operational efficiency. This inefficiency led to many manufacturing plants closing and a climbing unemployment rate. The result is a loss of U.S. manufacturing knowledge and manufacturing jobs. Historically, the manufacturing workforce was often composed of family members who had worked for generations at the same plant. The sharing of manufacturing knowledge occurred at the dinner table. In addition, skilled workers rose through the ranks and held management positions, thereby expanding the knowledge beyond the family. In this way, manufacturing knowledge continued to grow through the sharing of ideas. As competition increased and methodologies changed, the required skill set changed. Remaining competitive meant hiring managers with university-generated business skills and little or no hands-on manufacturing experience. These highly educated and poorly experienced leaders began encouraging the older manufacturing generation to retire – or simply downsized them altogether. This meant a continued loss of historical and hands-on knowledge over the last 50 years.

In 1950, manufacturing was about 35 percent of total employment. In 2004, this number dropped to only 13 percent, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland economic commentary “Why Are We Losing Manufacturing Jobs?” In 2014, the number was only 6.6 percent. These changes made learning from the past difficult at best. I began to write this article over 30 years ago when I was a production manufacturing worker at Sikorsky Aircraft. I witnessed the jobs leaving firsthand. Thirty years later while conducting research for my doctoral dissertation, I discovered that the missing link to that mass exodus of jobs was the devastating loss of manufacturing knowledge. This discovery prompted the need to create a potential solution rooted in two very important U.S. industries: the career college and manufacturing communities. My research identified the career college sector as the community best equipped to support this ground-level important function in our nation. The career college community is grounded firmly in a context that is best equipped to support the U.S. manufacturing industry, because career colleges, universities and vocational schools are closest to the workforce. Bringing well-paying manufacturing jobs back is critical to the future of our sector.

The global labor market has become strong outside the U.S. because of the high labor cost stigma associated with the U.S. economy. Heightened domestic costs empowered millions of people around the world to compete for U.S. jobs. This increased global competition led to downsizing of the manufacturing sector in the U.S. Many products formerly manufactured in the U.S. are now manufactured in part or in whole elsewhere in the world. U.S. companies outsourced manufacturing because the company’s leaders honestly believed American workers held no competitive advantage over cheap offshore labor. This strategy caused great devastation by halting investments in manufacturing technology and education. When companies do not have the additional capital generated from higher revenue to invest back into the business, the result is a loss of competitive advantage and shared knowledge.

The U.S. economy relies heavily on manufacturing, meaning that the sustained growth of the manufacturing industry is paramount to economic stability. The purpose of this article is to introduce the feasibility of a certification to bridge the gap between manufacturing and research in the U.S. by establishing a side-by- side value education partnership that links manufacturing industries and the career college community. The researcher sought to understand the challenges from both a practitioner’s and researcher’s perspective. Manufacturing leaders participating in the survey for the feasibility study were from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Rolls Royce, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and United Technologies; the survey also included supply chain leaders from the U.S. government. Eighty percent of the survey respondents agreed that there is a need for a new manufacturing practitioner certification. Eighty-three percent of the survey respondents agreed that a new certified professional would improve manufacturing productivity through focused career education. Ninety-four percent of the survey respondents agreed that engaging in technology and career education would increase manufacturing opportunities.

My study provided the educational capital to identify the need for developing a new joint manufacturing and research career-educated specialist, called the certified manufacturing practitioner (CMP). The CMP concept simplifies the means to link the past, the present, and the future by developing business solutions from shared leaders’ experiences in the manufacturing industries. The new certified manufacturing practitioner program is designed to improve knowledge sharing through case study evaluation that is grounded in where the manufacturing jobs reside. This shared education understanding takes the manufacturing case study out of the university classroom to the manufacturing shop floor. Career-guided steps are necessary to prevent further degradation of the manufacturing knowledge base. Historical literature provides the means to improve the U.S. manufacturing industry’s productivity and competitiveness through past and present case studies. Learning from history can improve the future. Business and manufacturing case studies provide real-life stories of successes and failures in the same industry and should be the basis for knowledge sharing. Students can best obtain and share this knowledge when the career education community is committed to rolling up its sleeves to deliver hands-on career education experience directly from the U.S. manufacturing source: the manufacturing shop floor.

The problem today is that business-manufacturing case studies do not receive adequate attention. It is difficult for a manufacturing business to be competitive in today’s volatile business market without having the means to review, understand and benefit from experience. Not learning from the past creates a communication disconnect and knowledge loss, which has a direct link to lost manufacturing businesses and jobs. In manufacturing, when learning stems from past successes and mistakes, business efficiency and competitiveness naturally follow, because an understanding of the past reduces the risk of repeating the same mistake – or, even worse, not learning from or sharing success stories. Success is dependent on the ability to develop and identify manufacturing solutions from case studies. This ability also can provide a heads-up display for market changes, diversity of markets and the ability to adapt to markets with a historical customer perspective that is practitioner-based. A CMP practitioner can fuel progressive learning across corporate cultures and different leadership styles, and he or she could have the influence to build upon strong team-based relationships that share knowledge.

The cost of waiting for old ideas to catch up with modern-day manufacturing practices obstructs new manufacturing market opportunities. Such obstructions represent a stream of wasteful manufacturing practices, making it difficult to be competitive in today’s volatile manufacturing markets. The loss of competitiveness results in lost manufacturing work and higher unemployment statistics. Once people become unemployed, 44 percent remain unemployed for 27 weeks or more, as reported by the Congressional Budget Office. CMP becomes the natural bridge by forming sustainable manufacturing solutions based on experiences, while at the same time observing market changes that provide the means to respond, adapt and capitalize on this market change. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of employees becomes important to rediscovering the company’s value. CMP career college partnerships work with U.S. manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money.

Today, the manufacturing industry knowledge base is limited to real-time events that occur daily in the manufacturing industry. The CMP embraces a holistic and unified approach in career education study connected to the manufacturing shop floor, and it creates the means to retain and share manufacturing knowledge. Imagine the education possibilities when the career college community reshapes the U.S. and global manufacturing industry. So, is the career college community ready to take CMP from a research study concept to a successful manufacturing reality? I think so. Best Regards, Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


StraighterLine

What We Do:

StraighterLine provides high-quality online college courses that are guaranteed to fit into your degree program.

With StraighterLine you earn your college degree from the top career focused universities, in the field and ultimately in the career of your choice in less time, with less stress and with $15,000 less in student debt.


adapting to change a message to think about …

 

American Writer

In today’s fast pace diverse employer market environment, to stay on top as a leader in whatever process or  function you perform, or to continue to be a competitive company.

A focus on continuous  improvement must be achieved – bringing a diverse aggressive person into an  organization, even if that person is not a perfect fit…this is always desired
and welcome.

Because, that out-of-the-box  individual will stimulate change, and adapting to change is one of the most  essential components of business success.

Change Manager

 by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us 


StraighterLine

What We Do:

StraighterLine  provides high-quality online college courses that  are guaranteed to fit into your degree program.

With StraighterLine you earn your college degree from the top career focused universities, in the field and  ultimately in the career of your choice in less time, with less stress and  with $15,000 less in student debt.

 


Our Founding Fathers Created A Dream

American Writer

Our Founding Fathers created a dream. The dream is a country where hard work, dedication to family, dedication to a country means something special. Our Founding Fathers  created a dream; over 200 years ago before any preconceived notion could have  formed about the importance of this dream. Preconceived convictions that society  must govern itself, that leadership should not be monarchs by birth. That leadership voted into office by the people, represents true leadership in a  self-govern society.

The people who select  their leaders, to represent them, to represent the desires of society to grow,  learn, and be self-satisfied with the world around it. Not reaching  complacency, but establishing a rewarding life in a nation’s domain. These  selected leaders become the left and right arm of those who put them in office.  We the People, our nation’s modern day descendants of the Founding Fathers, in  the truest sense, a nation of immigrants still creating American dreams.

We are witnessing these  dreams at the speed of technology in real-time, the first modern emergence is The Tea Party. Simply the tip of the iceberg of change, proof that the  founding Father’s dreams are still alive-and-kicking today.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


Social Influence of Learning. . . Rediscover Often!

Dr. Pietro Savo

Much of what we learn has a direct  correlation to the social influence of learning. Economic doom and gloom create a struggle that students of all ages experience. The struggle that keeps the  next generation away from attending higher education is the struggle that  continues to reduce any chance of eliminating the economic doom and gloom.


The United States higher education industry, 
we are beginning to import more students from other countries than educate our home grown version.

This economic college and university strategy has created an American talent decay that affects the entire United  States in the areas of engineering, technology, and manufacturing.

Higher education is a business, the struggle to fill classrooms; the higher-education enrolment solution’s makers take them to where the students are, well outside our U.S. borders.


In a devastating economy
, developing renewed higher education success is critically dependent on cultural adaptability. Cultural adaptability is a rediscovering process critical to the survival of any business; yes, higher education is a business. Colleges and universities have learned to adapt. An article from the NY Time February 5, 2012 talks about freshmen that come from abroad, most are from China, each pays tuition three times as much as students from United States and the classrooms are full. The higher education industry adapts to stay alive, at the cost of the US talent base.

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the impact of higher education comes in the form of lower unemployment rates. For example; a person with a high school diploma 10.3% unemployment rate (UR), associate’s degree 7.00% UR, bachelor’s degree 5.4% UR, master’s degree 4.0 UR, and doctoral degree 1.9% UR.

 Foreign countries have invested heavily in higher education to improve their unemployment statistics and improved their engineering, technology, and manufacturing bases at the same time; a very smart economic strategy!


What we know for sure
the education markets will continue to evolve, and the
amount of market change is unknown; what is clear is that “The Markets Drive the education spending, and the education spend drives our economy” and college and university resiliency are vital to capture this market change.

When self, influenced by rediscovery, the social influence of learning sets the stage. We have some work to do, all the books that have been written about the rediscovering process can be summed up into one rule; “Rediscover, rediscover often, and never stop rediscovering and the natural by-product becomes success!

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


You Can’t Be Too Military Friendly

The most successful institutions do more than grant certificates and degrees. When schools go above and beyond awarding degrees and certificates to U.S. military service members, their families and veterans, this extra initiative opens up new opportunities for veterans and employers alike.

Career College Central

You Can’t Be Too Military Friendly published, Career College Central Magazine November 2013 Edition

Education is power, regardless of where you earn your credentials. Once you have earned an education, no one can take it from you. What we are attempting to understand is what schools do “above and beyond” awarding a degree or certificate to U.S. military service members, their families and veteran higher education students. What activities can colleges and universities embrace to engage their military communities? What I discovered is a genuine enthusiasm to work with the military community, which I am excited to share with you. My day job transports my entire education team face-to- face with thousands of service members  and their  families weekly. I   have determined from the many conversations I’ve personally conducted and witnessed that a veteran’s No.1 concern before taking on the ever-so-important mission of higher education is, “How will this education result in a well-paying job?” There is no easy way to answer that question. I have been privileged to engage in conversations with passionate people working with service members, their families and veterans attending universities and colleges coast to coast.

No.1 concern before taking on the ever-so-important mission of higher education is, “How will this education result in a well-paying job?

These committed individuals include educators, administrators and staff who are doing everything in their power  to help these special students engage in and complete the right education to reach their dream careers. I have identified many college and university practices that current and future student-veterans may find well worth exploring.

The right education results in  the best future. I  selected the most veteran-oriented  schools through  research based  on certain keywords: military, college, jobs, career and education. These search words yielded a diverse group of higher education institutions not typically grouped together. They included Florida National University in Miami, Fla.; Grantham University in Kansas City, Mo.; Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas; and Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, Mass. We do not see a list of institutions such as these advertising together in any higher education marketing venue as military-friendly, but they have made commitments to service members and veterans that are well worth writing about.

In my many and endless conversations with school officials, one comment left me speechless – the school official actually thought we had lost the phone connection because I stopped talking. Dr. Ryan Van Dusen, Associate Director of Military and Veterans Programs for Texas Tech University and a former soldier in the U.S. Army, said, “You can’t be too military-friendly.” That statement by Van Dusen left me in stunned silence, which rarely happens. The most basic question that can be asked of a college or university is how it works to ensure that an education at that institution can result in a well-paying job. The answer, on the other hand, is much more complex; there is no simple list of  tasks an  institution can check off.

However, I did witness a common element among the successful  institutions; they  are all characterized  by the  passion to do more than grant certificates and degrees.

The principle of “you can’t be too military-friendly” became  clear as  a guiding  force and defining characteristic of the following schools:

Grantham University (GU) was founded in 1951 by World War II veteran Donald Grantham, who wanted to help fellow veterans improve their lives through higher education. Grantham University is a 100-percent online university serving a highly diverse student population. I spoke with Johanna Altland, Grantham University’s Director of Communications, and she spoke at length about educator obligations. To paraphrase Altland, the best way we can be advocates for veterans is by educating them to be career-ready, which is why we are all here in the first place. Grantham takes a multifaceted approach to student-veteran success. The university uses many internal and external initiatives to pave the way for future employment of veterans and service members. First, it educates its student-veterans; second, it prepares its student-veterans for employment in the civilian workforce. The university takes this model one step forward, smoothing the path for its students in the civilian job market by taking the time to educate employers on the value of hiring veterans.

This provides businesses with veteran recruitment strategies that benefit the veteran as well as the potential employer. The internal and external initiatives educate and prepare Grantham’s staff, their students and potential  employers. The cement that I believe holds this model together is twofold and includes Grantham Pathways, a virtual online job portal and a series of free e-books called Military-to-Civilian Transition Guide. This series comprises five books: Entering the Civilian Workforce – Your Journey Starts Here!, Choose a Career You’ll Love and Never Work a Day in Your Life, Professional Branding That Gets You Noticed, Make the “Call Pile” With Attention-Grabbing Resumes and Cover Letters, and How to Ace the Interview … and Stand Out From the Crowd.

Throughout my research, Grantham’s strategy to educate and prepare emerged as an obvious theme of delivering student-veteran successes. The internal and external initiatives educate and prepare Grantham’s staff, their students and potential employers. The cement that I believe holds this model together is twofold and includes Grantham Pathways, a virtual online job portal and a series of free e-books called Military-to-Civilian Transition Guide. This series comprises five books: Entering the Civilian Workforce – Your Journey Starts Here!, Choose a Career You’ll Love and Never Work a Day in Your Life, Professional Branding That Gets You Noticed, Make the “Call Pile” With Attention-Grabbing Resumes and Cover Letters, and How to Ace the Interview … and Stand Out From the Crowd. Throughout my research, Grantham’s strategy to educate and prepare emerged as an obvious theme of delivering student-veteran successes.

Florida National University (FNU) – Florida National University held its first class in 1988 in the city of Hialeah, Fla., under the name Florida International Institute.  A second campus opened in Miami one year later; a third campus was opened in a second Miami location in 1990. A fourth campus, the Online Learning Campus, was initiated in 2005. Florida National University offers Master’s, Bachelor’s and Associate degrees; diploma programs; and certificate programs. Florida National  University
President  Maria C.   Regueiro spoke with me about the university’s veteran support services. The needs of our honored service members, their families and veterans are many, said Regueiro. She went on to explain that the Florida National University team understands that travel and deployment can conflict with campus learning and provide a challenge for those in the military. Florida National University seeks to solve this problem with a combination of quality and flexibility, aiming to help service members obtain a career by providing them with online programs that are easy to access from wherever they are stationed. The university provides these students with academic advising, numerous resources and, most of all, support to carry on their academic dreams.

The university’s staff believes that one size does not match each military student’s needs. Instead, it develops and implements education programs that meet individual needs, backing these programs up with the university’s regional accreditation.The university’s student-veterans obtain more than an education; the institution’s career support stands out and continues to provide a resource to students long after graduation. The career support staff establishes a personal rapport with military students, giving them quick responses to their queries, concerns and needs. The staff believes it is critical to understand the limitations and special needs these students face, always letting them know that the university team members are there to support students in their career paths. Regueiro emphasized that the staff at Florida National University is grateful for the sacrifices student-veterans have made to preserve our freedom.

Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT is a technical design and engineering college. Wentworth was founded in 1904 and offers career-focused education through its 15 Bachelor’s degree programs in areas such as architecture, computer science, design, engineering, engineering technology and management, as well as Master ’s degrees in architecture and construction management. My conversation with Maureen Dischino, Executive Director of Admissions, and Jamie Kelly, Associate Vice President of Public Affairs, inspired in me an Oprah Winfrey-type “aha!” moment when they described two main student-veteran initiatives. The first initiative involves faculty mentors. Wentworth provides an informal student-veteran mentoring program, which provides student-veterans with a support structure in the form of mentors who have a military background. These mentors understand veterans’ history and have a common connection with them that helps the mentors have a positive impact on the students’ academic journeys, improving retention and completion rates and building lifelong relationships. Dischino  explained  that Wentworth  focuses on  trying to be as veteran-friendly as it can be.

Wentworth welcomes veteran relationships.   The counseling   center has   gone through specialized training to better support veterans and to take the concept of being veteran-friendly to a higher level. This  military-friendly training  begins with  the university’s commitment to veteran success and an understanding that careers and jobs play a critical role in veterans’ future. Wentworth looks for leadership qualities and maturity from students interested in pursuing careers, paying attention to the work student-veterans have done while in the military. That established leadership quality prepares student-veterans for memorable academic success at Wentworth. The second initiative is a co-op. Wentworth students’ job market industry advantage is fostered by a cooperative education (co-op) that touches more than 1,400 students each year, providing educational journeys that promote lifelong careers. Dischino said, ‘‘At Wentworth, we prepare students for specific careers.’’ Through two mandatory semesters of co-op, students fulfill a professional experience requirement needed to graduate. Wentworth’s co-op model creates the opportunity for potential employers to interact with Wentworth’s students, creating relationships built on motivated students seeking out real-world employment experiences. The co-op is an education model that links classroom learning with potential employers. Co-op students are paid by local, national and international employers, who then hire these students after graduation, resulting in an “education designed for return on investment (ROI).”

Texas Tech University (TTU)– Founded in 1923 on the South Plains of West Texas, Texas Tech is a comprehensive research university that retains the sense of a smaller liberal arts institution. Texas Tech earned my attention with a quote on its website by Kent Hance stating that the university “provides resources and educational opportunities needed to succeed in civilian life.” I found that intriguing, and I reached out to Van Dusen, who explained the Texas Tech University veteran support model. Working directly with the university’s huge career center, Texas employers come to Texas Tech because they know that the institution instills a work ethic that equals a success-oriented mindset in its students. Van Dusen added that having military experience today can make a student very marketable to prospective employers. Van Dusen pointed out that the career center is staffed by former U.S. military service members who help the military students translate their military experiences into terms civilian employers can understand.

This process of reframing professional experience becomes the foundation for a resume that demands attention from hiring companies. The career center supports the resume-building process and provides resources that improve interview skills.Many of the university’s student-veterans are 26 years old and feeling out of place attending college with 19-year-olds. They feel that they are already behind the bell curve. TTU strives to help military students understand that the experiences they gained in the military are going to put them significantly ahead of their non- military peers in terms of employment marketability.  Van Dusen went on to say that, for a veteran support career center to be truly effective, it must go well beyond being simply military- friendly – after all, “you can’t be too military-friendly.” TTU’s mission is to help any student who comes to the career center with a problem.
“Beyond military-friendly” appears to be Texas Tech University’s secret sauce to success, combined with their strong employer-community relationships.

We all have a responsibility to our military community to identify institutions that go beyond being simply military-friendly and have the attitude that you cannot be too military-friendly. When schools go above and beyond awarding degrees and certificates to U.S. military service members, their families and veterans, this extra initiative opens up new opportunities for veterans and employers alike.  Dr. Pete 

The featured institutions have implemented proven higher education solutions that are working across our great nation and prove that the principle “you can’t be too military-friendly” begins with you.

You Can’t Be Too Military Friendly published, Career College Central Magazine November 2013 Edition

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2011

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Pietro Savo E-Mail Link Dr.Pete@EducationIsPower.US


Solving the world’s problems will require a different kind of thinking…

Young & Old

“Children do not have the problems we old people create, but they do have solutions that are straightforward simple and realistic because in the child’s mind, everything is possible”

Solving the world’s problems will require a different kind of thinking. Einstein said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” The solution points to the young and old working together. Children have kind of a grounding effect; they take the complexity out of life and make it simple. Adults tend to make everything that was simple very complex.  Children and the old are humanity’s balance, by melting of the children and the old together develops a reality of common sense to the lowest common denominator. Hence, children learn as adults learn. Children do not have the problems we old people create, but they do have solutions that are straightforward simple and realistic because in the child’s mind, everything is possible.

“Children have kind of a grounding effect; they take the complexity out of life and make it simple”

Impossible is simply a mere word that has no meaning for a child, as adults we can learn that going forward means listening to our future. To solve our world problems, what I suggest is to team old people with school age elementary school, middle school, and high school people. We need to engage the brightest smartest minds in our future when the impossible is possible and simple.  We need to go away from the same kind of thinking that creates our problems.  The solutions will come from ideas, passions and excitement of teaming brilliant people from all ages, perhaps
avoiding problems altogether.

“We need to engage the brightest smartest minds in our future when the impossible is possible and simple”

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2013

Business

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo

Do you believe the Miracle on 34th Street model can work in Higher Education? Originally Blog published Jan 29, 2012

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Do you believe the Miracle on 34th Street model can work in Higher Education?

Dr. Pietro Savo Blog

Do you believe the Miracle on 34th Street model can work in Higher Education?

Referring another school when your school does not offer what the student wants…

The US College and University community, to continue to ensure the highest academic degree programs of interest and continue to prosper in business. The higher-education industry must begin to think out-of-the-box, by developing and implementing academic countermeasures that are greater than their own university’s business interests.

Studies show that the natural by-product of students experiencing academic interests that they perceive are met (what is important to them), results in higher retention and graduation rates.

In the best interest of students, we give referrals to our college and university friends, or perhaps institutions that you may list as competition. Especially when the other institutions have the best academic degree programs of interest that the student’s desires to enroll in.

In my travels, I have noticed some higher education institutions are doing this already, and that is where I got the idea from for this blog article, thank you 🙂

However, we are far from there yet; how many times do admissions people tell the student prospect that we do not offer that program you’re interested in; however, this program we offer is just as good or similar?

I know in business; we sell our own brand. However, when this occurs in higher education (this is my opinion) the message, you are promoting is mediocre academic interests is the normality at your school.

The Miracle on 34th Street model, when Macy’s Department Store referred Gimbals Department store because Gimbals had the best skates. Every good movie begins as a very smart idea; proof is Macys is still in business and Gimbals closed their last store in 1987.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2013

Business

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo

Do you believe the Miracle on 34th Street model can work in Higher Education? Originally Blog published Jan 29, 2012

Jobs 4 ALL Now
Jobs 4 All Now is an amazing 10 Step System that takes the guesswork out of getting hired. Jobs 4 All Now team is composed of some of the most highly sought after experts in the employment, networking and career coaching industries.

Copy and paste this code 4E6 and receive $10 off this fantastic service!

Good Luck – now go find a job! “#1 Goal” Jobs 4 All Now