Tag Archives: historical research

Right People On The Bus Philosophy Is The Wrong Philosophy!

pietro savo

Getting the “right people on the bus” philosophy is the wrong philosophy. How disappointing history is, business solutions to improving the United States manufacturing industry has not changed in a hundred years. Back in the early 1900s and 1800s the United States went through a similar economic downturn. The root cause was simple, we failed to keep up with technology, and we failed to preserve an educated workforce. We also have lost sight of the markets, combined with a lack of market aggressiveness; we began importing more than we exported which in turn created a devastating imbalance in trade. The historical research to support these statements is simple for anyone to conduct using Google or Yahoo. Therefore, the disappointment comes about from our lack of learning from our past lessons learned, it appears we wasted all this relevant knowledge and are reinventing the wrong wheel.

We have become so focused on getting the “right people on the bus” that we’ve destroyed morale. We as a society have created a negative bearing for employee integrity because the “right people on the bus” mind-set clearly means everyone is just a number. Getting the “right people on the bus” philosophy is the wrong philosophy, because most firms can’t afford to be getting rid of people to make room for the perceived right person. The people left behind become negatively affected by this practice. These people left behind subconsciously fail to thrive, always followed by a succession of updated resumes going out in all directions. Even the top performers now left with a feeling of despair; this is a natural human behavior that adversely affects employee loyalty and performance.

This means, having the “right people on the bus” is not enough: getting the people in the right seat is of greater importance. You can do this by building positive relationships, identifying and focusing on people’s strengths, and exploiting these strengths in a way that everyone wins, and everyone benefits!

“right people on the bus” from Collins, J. (2001). Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t. New York: HarperCollins.

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Never Stop Rediscovering your Business

We are surrounded by economic doom and gloom, and business growth and business survival is critical to our economy. Today as consumers we import more than we export and job loss from this strategy has created economic devastation that affects the entire world. It appears that our economic strategists have forgotten to leave the world better than they find it; instead they choose to get rich, at such an overwhelming cost to the rest of us. You can’t help wonder what is being taught in top business schools, “Gluttony 501!” In a devastating economy, developing renewed business success dependent on cultural adaptability is key. Cultural adaptability is a rediscovering process critical to the survival of any business. Business complacency is an example of untrue leadership or non leadership, any company that becomes complacent is certain to fail.

The markets will continue to evolve and the amount of market change is unknown; what is clear is that “The Markets Drives the Business” and business resiliency is vital. Rediscovering business success and having the right people on the bus is not enough, more important is having the right people in the right seat; this is a never-ending rediscovering process. All the books that have been written about the rediscovering process can be summed up into one rule; “Rediscover, rediscover often, and never stop rediscovering your business.” Businesses managed by this rule create success in all directions, is fun to work at, have very high morale and low employee turnover, and rediscovering is the spirit of success!


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Manufacturing Research Practitioner™ by Pietro


Manufacturing Research Practitioner™

A Manufacturing Research Practitioner (MRP) is a person who engages in real world applied research with a basic understanding of global economies and cultures for advancing manufacturing practices. MRP will have a deep knowledge of how to implement lean manufacturing processes, how to manage the supply chain efficiently, and how to project management, problem solve and work effectively as a team member or leader.[1] Manufacturing research practitioner represents an army of academic and business manufacturing practitioners who will join forces to become one defined entity.

Manufacturing Research Practitioner

Manufacturing Research Practitioner demonstrated that team based organizational learning does occur when promoted by management, and when supported by a suitable learning infrastructure. The internal manufacturing performance model and the empirical evidence provide an important building block to develop an inclusive theory for preparing learning tactics formulated on business growth strategies promoted by people.Because it represents a proposed model where the empirical evidence suggests rational theories for formulating effective learning strategies in the manufacturing environments. This knowledge comes to acceptable conclusions identifying the genuine importance of organizational learning for human capital. People involvement helps determine good research from poor research and creates solid bonds between researcher and manufacturing practitioner.

The manufacturing world has changed, and the conventional educational curricula for engineers must change along with it. Technical skills provided as the core of almost every engineering degree program are still critical, but the workforce needs to come into industry equipped with additional skills, and the ability to apply what they know to meet challenges that didn’t exist a few decades ago. To be successful, today’s manufacturing professionals need to know how to implement lean manufacturing processes, how to manage the supply chain efficiently, and how to work effectively as team members.[2]

Manufacturing Research will produce more products for fewer resources. With the identification of critical topics, only research that captured the attention of practitioners and researchers since the early 1980s. With the recent popularity of lean manufacturing statistical process control tool quality management in six Sigma and demonstrated the importance of practitioners over into other industries. [3]

Manufacturing Research Practitioner inspires the investment in the culture that creates changes around the people and the by-product becomes the “go-and-do-it” team! Teach the value stream at all levels of an organization. People can be much like a radical undeveloped river flow after a sudden downburst of rain. When you plan for the downburst, what you get in return is a developed flow that is controlled and organized. People become part of the great successes when instilling the values and culture of continuous improvement are focused on developing talent and leadership, innovatively redeploying, and cross training. Incorporating value-added services, standardizing, and production methods creates a robust people infrastructure that is efficient, profitable, filled with quality, and is delivery driven. [4]

As we get closer to understanding the importance of Manufacturing Research Practitioner, clarity or the desperation of how important it is to once again make successful the United States manufacturing industry.

References

1. Savo, Pietro (July 2008). Manufacturing Research Practitioner. Boston.
2. Cebeci, Tuncer (August 2003). Broadening the manufacturing practitioner’s education. New York: Society of Manufacturing Engineers.
3. Liberopoulos, George (July 2006). Stochastic Modeling of Manufacturing Systems: Advances in Design, Performance Evaluation, and Control Issues (Hardcover). New York: International Journal of Production Research.
4. Savo, Pietro (2007). 10 Secrets to Successful Lean Manufacturing Implementation. Boston: Lulu Tradition Books.


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