Tag Archives: Live Free or Die

My Teaching Philosophy

My teaching philosophy revolves around the homeland security world; the most important element to communicate to students is that not all the textbooks have been written yet. These textbooks are being developed in the field everyday.quality_of_life

My teaching philosophy is based on the understanding that the teacher and student roles are interchangeable in a truly inspiring learning environment. My teaching philosophy; a homeland security teacher becomes an expert by never being content with the obvious. It is imperative that the teacher has the skills to best communicate one’s knowledge to his or her students, which inspires the student to seek out knowledge beyond the teacher’s expertise. This inspiration becomes expertise that is useful to both the student and teacher because to seek greater knowledge is never-ending in any direction.

My philosophy is to fashion a meaningful homeland security practitioner’s classroom environment for my students. A teacher is always obligated to deliver a meaningful education environment that results in noteworthy learning outcomes. Homeland security learning outcomes become a successful reality when the teacher forms the real-world connections between student and the global security community.

My principal goal is to ready and inspires future homeland security practitioners; the students of today become the safety security solution providers of tomorrow.

by Dr. Pietro Savo

 

 

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Manufacturing Success-Evolving to adapt to changes in the manufacturing industry

Manufacturing Success

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. How can we rejuvenate it? And how would career colleges benefit from a manufacturing renaissance?

Manufacturing Success

By Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. Both print and online media document new automated technology and outline the lack of competitive advantage to improve operational efficiency. This inefficiency led to many manufacturing plants closing and a climbing unemployment rate. The result is a loss of U.S. manufacturing knowledge and manufacturing jobs. Historically, the manufacturing workforce was often composed of family members who had worked for generations at the same plant. The sharing of manufacturing knowledge occurred at the dinner table. In addition, skilled workers rose through the ranks and held management positions, thereby expanding the knowledge beyond the family. In this way, manufacturing knowledge continued to grow through the sharing of ideas.

As competition increased and methodologies changed, the required skill set changed. Remaining competitive meant hiring managers with university-generated business skills and little or no hand-on manufacturing experience. These highly educated and poorly experienced leaders began encouraging the older manufacturing generation to retire – or simply downsized them altogether. This meant a continued loss of historical and hands-on knowledge over the last 50 years. In 1950, manufacturing was about 35 percent of total employment. In 2004, this number dropped to only 13 percent, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland economic commentary “Why Are We Losing Manufacturing Jobs?” In 2014, the number was only 6.6 percent. These changes made learning from the past difficult at best.

I began to write this article over 30 years ago when I was a production manufacturing worker at Sikorsky Aircraft. I witnessed the jobs leaving firsthand. Thirty years later while conducting research for my doctoral dissertation, I discovered that the missing link to that mass exodus of jobs was the devastating loss of manufacturing knowledge. This discovery prompted the need to create a potential solution rooted in two very important U.S. industries: the career college and manufacturing communities. My research identified the career college sector as the community best equipped to support this ground-level important function in our nation.

The career college community is grounded firmly in a context that is best equipped to support the U.S. manufacturing industry, because career colleges, universities and vocational schools are closest to the workforce. Bringing well-paying manufacturing jobs back is critical to the future of our sector. The global labor market has become strong outside the U.S. because of the high labor cost stigma associated with the U.S. economy. Heightened domestic costs empowered millions of people around the world to compete for U.S. jobs. This increased global competition led to downsizing of the manufacturing sector in the U.S. Many products formerly manufactured in the U.S. are now manufactured in part or in whole elsewhere in the world. U.S. companies outsourced manufacturing because the company’s leaders honestly believed American workers held no competitive advantage over cheap offshore labor. This strategy caused great devastation by halting investments in manufacturing technology and education. When companies do not have the additional capital generated from higher revenue to invest back into the business, the result is a loss of competitive advantage and shared knowledge.

The U.S. economy relies heavily on manufacturing, meaning that the sustained growth of the manufacturing industry is paramount to economic stability. The purpose of this article is to introduce the feasibility of a certification to bridge the gap between manufacturing and research in the U.S. by establishing a side-by-side value education partnership that links manufacturing industries and the career college community.

The researcher sought to understand the challenges from both a practitioner’s and researcher’s perspective. Manufacturing leaders participating in the survey for the feasibility study were from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Rolls Royce, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and United Technologies; the survey also included supply chain leaders from the U.S. government. Eighty percent of the survey respondents agreed that there is a need for a new manufacturing practitioner certification. Eighty-three percent of the survey respondents agreed that a new certified professional would improve manufacturing productivity through focused career education. Ninety-four percent of the survey respondents agreed that engaging in technology and career education would increase manufacturing opportunities. My study provided the educational capital to identify the need for developing a new joint manufacturing and research career-educated specialist, called the certified manufacturing practitioner (CMP).

The CMP concept simplifies the means to link the past, the present and the future by developing business solutions from shared leaders’ experiences in the manufacturing industries. The new certified manufacturing practitioner program is designed to improve knowledge sharing through case study evaluation that is grounded in where the manufacturing jobs reside. This shared education understanding takes the manufacturing case study out of the university classroom to the manufacturing shop floor. Career-guided steps are necessary to prevent further degradation of the manufacturing knowledge base. Historical literature provides the means to improve the U.S. manufacturing industry’s productivity and competitiveness through past and present case studies. Learning from history can improve the future. Business and manufacturing case studies provide real-life stories of successes and failures in the same industry and should be the basis for knowledge sharing. Students can best obtain and share this knowledge when the career education community is committed to rolling up its sleeves to deliver hands-on career education experience directly from the U.S. manufacturing source: the manufacturing shop floor.

The problem today is that business-manufacturing case studies do not receive adequate attention. It is difficult for a manufacturing business to be competitive in today’s volatile business market without having the means to review, understand, and benefit from experience. Not learning from the past creates a communication disconnect and knowledge loss, which has a direct link to lost manufacturing businesses and jobs. In manufacturing, when learning stems from past successes and mistakes, business efficiency, and competitiveness naturally follow, because an understanding of the past reduces the risk of repeating the same mistake – or, even worse, not learning from or sharing success stories. Success is dependent on the ability to develop and identify manufacturing solutions from case studies. This ability also can provide a heads-up display for market changes, diversity of markets and the ability to adapt to markets with a historical customer perspective that is practitioner-based.

A CMP practitioner can fuel progressive learning across corporate cultures and different leadership styles, and he or she could have the influence to build upon strong team-based relationships that share knowledge. The cost of waiting for old ideas to catch up with modern-day manufacturing practices obstructs new manufacturing market opportunities. Such obstructions represent a stream of wasteful manufacturing practices, making it difficult to be competitive in today’s volatile manufacturing markets. The loss of competitiveness results in lost manufacturing work and higher unemployment statistics. Once people become unemployed, 44 percent remain unemployed for 27 weeks or more, as reported by the Congressional Budget Office. CMP becomes the natural bridge by forming sustainable manufacturing solutions based on experiences, while at the same time observing market changes that provide the means to respond, adapt and capitalize on this market change. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of employees becomes important to rediscovering the company’s value.

CMP career college partnerships work with U.S. manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. Today, the manufacturing industry knowledge base is limited to real-time events that occur daily in the manufacturing industry. The CMP embraces a holistic and unified approach in career education study connected to the manufacturing shop floor, and it creates the means to retain and share manufacturing knowledge.

Imagine the education possibilities when the career college community reshapes the U.S. and global manufacturing industry. So, is the career college community ready to take CMP from a research study concept to a successful manufacturing reality? I think so.   Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo 

Originally published: Career College Central Magazine, May/June 2014

http://www.careercollegecentral.com/pdf/CCC_May_2014.pdf


Manufacturing Success: Evolving to adapt to change…

https://i0.wp.com/www.careercollegecentral.com/images/may14-thumbnail-img.png

Manufacturing Success: Evolving to adapt to changes in the manufacturing industry. Career College Central Magazine, May 2014

The U.S. manufacturing sector has undergone a massive change in the last several decades. Both print and online media document new automated technology and outline the lack of competitive advantage to improve operational efficiency. This inefficiency led to many manufacturing plants closing and a climbing unemployment rate. The result is a loss of U.S. manufacturing knowledge and manufacturing jobs. Historically, the manufacturing workforce was often composed of family members who had worked for generations at the same plant. The sharing of manufacturing knowledge occurred at the dinner table. In addition, skilled workers rose through the ranks and held management positions, thereby expanding the knowledge beyond the family. In this way, manufacturing knowledge continued to grow through the sharing of ideas. As competition increased and methodologies changed, the required skill set changed. Remaining competitive meant hiring managers with university-generated business skills and little or no hands-on manufacturing experience. These highly educated and poorly experienced leaders began encouraging the older manufacturing generation to retire – or simply downsized them altogether. This meant a continued loss of historical and hands-on knowledge over the last 50 years.

In 1950, manufacturing was about 35 percent of total employment. In 2004, this number dropped to only 13 percent, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland economic commentary “Why Are We Losing Manufacturing Jobs?” In 2014, the number was only 6.6 percent. These changes made learning from the past difficult at best. I began to write this article over 30 years ago when I was a production manufacturing worker at Sikorsky Aircraft. I witnessed the jobs leaving firsthand. Thirty years later while conducting research for my doctoral dissertation, I discovered that the missing link to that mass exodus of jobs was the devastating loss of manufacturing knowledge. This discovery prompted the need to create a potential solution rooted in two very important U.S. industries: the career college and manufacturing communities. My research identified the career college sector as the community best equipped to support this ground-level important function in our nation. The career college community is grounded firmly in a context that is best equipped to support the U.S. manufacturing industry, because career colleges, universities and vocational schools are closest to the workforce. Bringing well-paying manufacturing jobs back is critical to the future of our sector.

The global labor market has become strong outside the U.S. because of the high labor cost stigma associated with the U.S. economy. Heightened domestic costs empowered millions of people around the world to compete for U.S. jobs. This increased global competition led to downsizing of the manufacturing sector in the U.S. Many products formerly manufactured in the U.S. are now manufactured in part or in whole elsewhere in the world. U.S. companies outsourced manufacturing because the company’s leaders honestly believed American workers held no competitive advantage over cheap offshore labor. This strategy caused great devastation by halting investments in manufacturing technology and education. When companies do not have the additional capital generated from higher revenue to invest back into the business, the result is a loss of competitive advantage and shared knowledge.

The U.S. economy relies heavily on manufacturing, meaning that the sustained growth of the manufacturing industry is paramount to economic stability. The purpose of this article is to introduce the feasibility of a certification to bridge the gap between manufacturing and research in the U.S. by establishing a side-by- side value education partnership that links manufacturing industries and the career college community. The researcher sought to understand the challenges from both a practitioner’s and researcher’s perspective. Manufacturing leaders participating in the survey for the feasibility study were from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Rolls Royce, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and United Technologies; the survey also included supply chain leaders from the U.S. government. Eighty percent of the survey respondents agreed that there is a need for a new manufacturing practitioner certification. Eighty-three percent of the survey respondents agreed that a new certified professional would improve manufacturing productivity through focused career education. Ninety-four percent of the survey respondents agreed that engaging in technology and career education would increase manufacturing opportunities.

My study provided the educational capital to identify the need for developing a new joint manufacturing and research career-educated specialist, called the certified manufacturing practitioner (CMP). The CMP concept simplifies the means to link the past, the present, and the future by developing business solutions from shared leaders’ experiences in the manufacturing industries. The new certified manufacturing practitioner program is designed to improve knowledge sharing through case study evaluation that is grounded in where the manufacturing jobs reside. This shared education understanding takes the manufacturing case study out of the university classroom to the manufacturing shop floor. Career-guided steps are necessary to prevent further degradation of the manufacturing knowledge base. Historical literature provides the means to improve the U.S. manufacturing industry’s productivity and competitiveness through past and present case studies. Learning from history can improve the future. Business and manufacturing case studies provide real-life stories of successes and failures in the same industry and should be the basis for knowledge sharing. Students can best obtain and share this knowledge when the career education community is committed to rolling up its sleeves to deliver hands-on career education experience directly from the U.S. manufacturing source: the manufacturing shop floor.

The problem today is that business-manufacturing case studies do not receive adequate attention. It is difficult for a manufacturing business to be competitive in today’s volatile business market without having the means to review, understand and benefit from experience. Not learning from the past creates a communication disconnect and knowledge loss, which has a direct link to lost manufacturing businesses and jobs. In manufacturing, when learning stems from past successes and mistakes, business efficiency and competitiveness naturally follow, because an understanding of the past reduces the risk of repeating the same mistake – or, even worse, not learning from or sharing success stories. Success is dependent on the ability to develop and identify manufacturing solutions from case studies. This ability also can provide a heads-up display for market changes, diversity of markets and the ability to adapt to markets with a historical customer perspective that is practitioner-based. A CMP practitioner can fuel progressive learning across corporate cultures and different leadership styles, and he or she could have the influence to build upon strong team-based relationships that share knowledge.

The cost of waiting for old ideas to catch up with modern-day manufacturing practices obstructs new manufacturing market opportunities. Such obstructions represent a stream of wasteful manufacturing practices, making it difficult to be competitive in today’s volatile manufacturing markets. The loss of competitiveness results in lost manufacturing work and higher unemployment statistics. Once people become unemployed, 44 percent remain unemployed for 27 weeks or more, as reported by the Congressional Budget Office. CMP becomes the natural bridge by forming sustainable manufacturing solutions based on experiences, while at the same time observing market changes that provide the means to respond, adapt and capitalize on this market change. Finding the strengths and weaknesses of employees becomes important to rediscovering the company’s value. CMP career college partnerships work with U.S. manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money.

Today, the manufacturing industry knowledge base is limited to real-time events that occur daily in the manufacturing industry. The CMP embraces a holistic and unified approach in career education study connected to the manufacturing shop floor, and it creates the means to retain and share manufacturing knowledge. Imagine the education possibilities when the career college community reshapes the U.S. and global manufacturing industry. So, is the career college community ready to take CMP from a research study concept to a successful manufacturing reality? I think so. Best Regards, Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2014

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us


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THE FUTURE OF THE CAREER COLLEGE IS TODAY – Aligning with the needs of job creators…


January 2014
Today’s career college looks ahead while embracing both the present and future. It is empowered by the positive impact on higher education trending toward this unlimited future. The setback is that leadership from the education community and the job creators is not in alignment. Everyone is fighting for education market share or finding the best employee, which leads to the old standards for business growth. Everyone is in it only for himself or herself with no regard for bringing greater value to students and the job seekers. Fight to the top, and win at any cost. Both groups appear more focused on specific technology or tasks, not on lifelong learning to enhance education and job-creating productivity. That brings us to suggest the business problem to solve is having the right education offering to meet employer resource demands. 

Read the entire article featured in Career College Central Magazine, January 2014 page 42

The business problem is how can the education community align itself with the job creators.  The old standard of having the best brand name, self-perceived education offering or providing the best contact network is not enough. Are leaders ready to align in a way that promotes the right education offering that will encourage economic job-sustained growth both present and future?   All the signs favor that the look-ahead at leadership, as it pertains to keeping education programs tied closely to the needs of employers, is taking shape. This engagement takes us to an international reach supported by the career college community. This community is also determined to improve future look-aheads to education designs closely connected to the needs of the current and future job creators.

The hints about the future are scattered around us in plain view. Our community must open up our minds to the possibilities. Take a different look, use a second set of eyes that are open wide, and you just might be able to watch the possibilities turn into realities. Is this a philosophy or just wishful thinking? In my opinion, this represents the futuristic employer and the educator trends worth sharing. This future is only a split second away. These futuristic trends and strategy hints come from leadership teaming between career college communities and employers. Teaming promotes new job creator and education best practices.

Career college leaders are continually working to keep programs tied closely to the needs of employers. The future is keeping education relevant; leadership representing future employers will get connected and start mentoring early in the workforce higher education process, according to the Business Economics article “On the Importance of Education.” This outreach at the academic level will improve the ability to modify curriculum on the fly to meet changes in the business market. The market drives the business. The future is the career college community leading the teaming among colleges,  universities and vocational institutions, developing career trade education programs that speed up the process from education to a well-paying job.

The global employment economy will help to shape the future. Education supported by leadership in the future should be as encompassing as humanities’ diversity of culture. In the era of globalization, skill requirements of employers are clearly changing. According to the Journal of Business Economics and Management, employers in the future will require education programs that take into account cultural differences that will shape business organizations. Knowing how to build good relationships is an education that is cultural and is always changing. Future employers will demand the workforce’s adaptability.

The future leadership has identified the most important skills to succeed in the workplace: problem-solving, oral communication and ethics, as noted in a report from Tertiary Education and Management. Survey the job creators to discover how higher education can improve  education and training to reduce the gap between job and education offering.

According to the Journal of Industrial Relations, future employees have indicated that job satisfaction plays a very important role in creating customer satisfaction. Job creators have a stronger alignment with the career college community using market influences and trends to determine education practices that mold a person to having a higher job satisfaction.

All these points fall neatly in with the next education evolution spearheading major change: massive open online courses (MOOCs), a concept pressuring the more traditional online college and universities to rethink, retool, adapt, and try to stay in the education business. History is full of creative education ideas that arrive just in time to change all the rules and send the nonbelievers into a tailspin. In business, they represent what I call disruptive innovation, ideas, products and services that help create a new market and value network. You see corporations accustomed to making a profit in business embracing MOOCs as an efficient education tool to create better-trained workers at a smart, reasonable cost.  Companies such as AT&T, Google and others help design and even fund Web-based college classes. MOOCs provide a window into forces shaping the future of education and how the career college community can proactively engage in that influencing process.

Most MOOCs seem to be sponsored by large universities. The predicted volume of employers embracing the MOOC process will demand speed to market. Speed to market is not a trait that traditional  education institutions are best known for. The future belongs to the education community best equipped to develop and deploy to both national and regional audiences on topics of many special job-support programs quickly. The future is pleading for the career college community to take the leadership role in developing a second stage of MOOC industry. This writer suggests your institution reach out to business organizations and ask them what they are looking for in present and future employees. Warning: Before you reach out to businesses, be prepared to develop and deploy these MOOC programs quickly. Those institutions that master this will become the education masters of the future. For your day-to-day business operations to make money, focus on keeping education relevant by teaming among colleges, universities and vocational institutions. Be steadfast and accommodate the global employment economy, creating customers using job-market influences and trends to determine education practices. Finally, the modern-day education tools embracing unlimited technology spearheading this major education future are MOOCs, and the future is here today.

The future is on everyone’s mind. I predict the career college community will lead or pull other education organizations along kicking and screaming, if need be. Education that results in a vocation and is firmly cemented in our career college community begins with all of us. A vocation is the ultimate looking-ahead leadership journey.  Dr. Pete

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo


The head of DARPA discussed in Military Times that the US was falling behind in technological superiority.

American Writer - Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo

The US declines in the technological superiority has been predominant for the last 50 years! That is what prompted me to write my doctoral dissertation on developing a practitioner, which are both the manufacturing expert and a trained researcher! A certification system that combines both very important skill sets that can influence technological superiority by using all the modern research tools available today.

It appears the technological progress has taken the traditional educational realm out of the equation, perhaps moving too fast. From a researcher’s perspective, the traditional research community lacks the understanding, and the necessary skills to communicate at the many productive levels of the modern business and manufacturing cultural strength! The traditional researcher lacks the level of urgency, because traditional funding comes from places that prescribe research direction, and the results.

Old research understanding does not stand up to sharing information in the digital age, at the modern speed of learning.

In my opinion, funding tends to drive the research in the direction that is less progressive, less likely to support new initiatives and technological advancements! Old research understanding does not stand up to sharing information in the digital age, at the modern speed of learning. The education community that is made up of practitioners from the established business and manufacturing communities have the potential to change the technological superiority trend to a growth perspective once again!

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2012

Business

Manufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Read, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

Dr. Pietro Savo

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Manufacturing Business Pyramid Effect

American Writer by Dr. Pietro Savo

Many small manufacturing businesses today resemble what I call an upside-down pyramid. Can you envision such a pyramid attempting to balance on its point? What you have is an impossible balancing act of monumental proportions; near impossible regardless how much money you throw at it! Many manufacturing businesses today, reside in a world managed by tyrannical leadership, with no experienced balanced leadership approaches to speak of at all.

Businesses that grow without investing in a balanced leadership infrastructure result in one person making all the decisions. A manufacturing environment with one person making all the decisions is easy to spot. Walk around the business, you will see people standing around pretending to be busy. The difficult to balance, such as an upside-down pyramid can still work and lead to manufacturing business success. For example, a two to four million-dollar revenue manufacturing business with about 20 employees is manageable with one strong leader. The balancer is physically and emotionally unable to manage every key element of that business with efficiency, such as responding to the business’s needs in a timely manner. The huge “but” here; is this type of leader, does not make decisions based on sound business data? Instead, decisions strictly emotionally based using non-factual data. This is where the term “Pie in Sky” came from a one sided skewed reality. His or her leadership reality rules that day, lending to many looks of bewilderment from their employees.

Emotional base decision making instead of fact-based decision making, results in employees reacting to change by always seeing the glass being half-empty, instead of as being half full. The negative aspect becomes the governing force, the performance influencer promoting counterproductive morale. What you have is the same people standing around waiting for someone to make a decision, now gossiping as well. Gossip is the natural by-product of working inside a tyrannical manufacturing company. Gossip is just as destructive as a tyrannical leader.

The solution is very simple, develop, and implement an evenly balanced business, by allowing your employees to help you do it. Occasionally, you will end up where you don’t want to be, that is acceptable as long as the new business direction results in some sort of positive balanced between business performance and leadership growth. Tyrannical leadership practices can end, by encouraging others to lead; make decisions, and yes occasionally these new people now involved in the decision process, can make mistakes. Mistakes are a positive aspect of change, when you learn from mistakes, and embrace mistakes as gained knowledge, you can now share them with others. The future is looking brighter; the manufacturing leadership business fix has a few essential parts called the Smart-Process:

  1. The smart-process begins with a comprehensive assessment of the business in the current state, exposing its strengths, and exposing its weaknesses. During the assessment phase, the weaknesses of what is perceived to be problems are studied, and targeted, for elimination.
  2. The next component is the change moment, the business as a whole accepts that it must change. The change phase is the cultural aspect of the processes that are going through a makeover of transforming a business from weakness to strength. In the mind of the employees, the change quickly becomes part of the solution.
  3. Next, make sure you have realistic, honest measuring systems in place to determine if the changes are actually creating value for the business, improving that business, and creating sustainable satisfaction for both internal and external customers.
  4. Finally, the full circle, share the leadership responsibilities, invest in many balanced leadership talents; “Leader’s number one responsibility is to make other leaders.” Having many leaders forces the pyramid to stop balancing on its pinnacle, and landing on a pyramid’s widest base, its foundation of strength. For that, reason pyramids can remain standing for eons of time, regardless where they are built.

If a business’s desires to stay in business, this business cannot reside in a world managed by tyrannical leadership, with no balanced leadership approaches to speak of at all. Team based leadership is adaptive, responsive to business market changes; and this team base ability is mandatory for manufacturing survival today.

by AMERICAN WRITER Dr. Pietro Savo Tradition Books Publication © 2011

BusinessManufacturing Research Practitioner ™ by Dr. Pietro Savo

Education Blog DirectoryRead, write, and question everything!Our voices are powerful and true!

Dr. Pietro Savo E-Mail Link blog@americanwriter.us

American Writer a Positive Thinking Movement by Dr. Pietro Savo


Change Warriors, the Next Iron Lady

Iron Lady

Change Warriors such as Sarah Palin, Nikki Haley, Michele Bachmann, Christine O’Donnell, and Jan Brewer. These women are changing the rules, bringing forth a firestorm of political transformation, which the Democratic Party left and the Republican Party right is frantically strategizing to capture the fever of change. The fever of change that the new Female Change Warriors bring with a vengeance to the political fight of the 21st Century, which has also over-flowed into the world’s political movement. The female political frenzy is not simply a United States (US) event, Julia Gillard the Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, Belinda Stronach a member of the Canadian Parliament, and Sitrida Geagea is a Lebanese politician have taken front stage and are making new rules in the 21st Century landscape, perhaps it is well overdue.

In the 1980s we witnessed a glimpse of things to come with Margaret Thatcher, who dominated international headlines and sustained the reputation as the Iron Lady. The Iron Lady was tough, a toughness clearly missing from today’s political leaders. During the Falkland Islands War, Margaret Thatcher threatened to use nuclear weapons, unless French President Francois Mitterrand gave the British the missile deactivate codes used by Exocet anti-ship missiles, that France had sold to Argentina (Magoudi, 2005). On May 4, 1982, two French-made jets in the Argentine air force attacked the British destroyer Sheffield killing 20 crew members and injuring 24, and the Iron Lady was not allowing it to happen again (Magoudi, 2005).

Our modern political world is in the need for the next Iron Lady, a female politician ready to lead, and protect her country from modern-day enemies. An Iron Lady not focused on political correctness, unless it favors her country. Our job as voters is to encourage the next Iron Lady, and with our vote create the vision to protect and place our country first, above-all-else!

Reference

Magoudi, A. (2005). Rendez-Vous – The psychoanalysis of François Mitterrand.

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We The People

We The People

“We The People” find ourselves searching for the next great leaders.

“We The People” for the past 230 years have been a Constitutional Republic, created and implemented by very wise people who risked everything not for self; but to create a great nation. What “We The People” search for again is a group of new leaders who are willing to risk everything not for self, but for “We The People!” These risk takers will be American Citizens from every corner of the United States.

Willing to serve “We The People” not for personal glory, but serve to once again to create the greatest nation on earth! History can, and will repeat itself, because “We The People” will not have it any other way!

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A Constitutional Republic is Not A Polite and Pretty Entity

Constitutional Republic
As a modern day society, it appears we have forgotten the groups of courageous citizens who banded together and risked everything to create our constitutional republic. A constitutional republic that many generations before us have been blessed to enjoy. The problem today is that liberals, moderates, and conservatives focus more on the argument than the actual importance of having the argument. Agree or not, the disagreement of different political viewpoints represents the only true important factor in the rhetoric. Because we must never stop debating, never stop disagreeing, and never stop questioning because that is what constitutional republic stands for.

A constitutional republic is not a polite and pretty entity; it can become fearful for the light-at-heart. When we stop arguing, when the rhetoric becomes one-sided, when any side is no longer willing to question, we achieve pure submission. Submission does not work in a constitutional republic; submission is not liberty nor is it being free. What does this all mean, there is no real republic without passionate rhetoric!


Regardless of where your political beliefs reside, be it left, middle or right, is not the concern, what is important is questioning our government to keep them honest and true to our best wishes. When we are questioning, we’re pro-actively taking the time to understand each issue that interests us, and affects us, as long as we independently determine our own belief at the end of the day that is true constitutional republic. Read, write, and question everything!

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I Have Been Told That I Am Too Patriotic!

911 Flag WTC

I have been told that I am too patriotic. I am the son of immigrants and my parents came to this country with only one suitcase that contained all their belongings. When they arrived in America, they were expected to become productive members of society, they were also expected to speak English, and if they could not achieve these two important requirements, they were expected to leave the country. Be productive and speak English, two clear-cut choices. My parents stayed and raised four productive children with English becoming their primary language.

Being the son of Italian immigrants, you would think I would have a natural interest in water fountains since Italy is historically known for their beautiful fountains. Since I am not interested in water fountains my wife surprised me and gave me a water fountain for my 50th birthday, and she is Irish, so I am not sure where that came from. Today was devoted to wiring the water fountain, to get it running because this project has been on my-honey-do list since July. Our home is 230 years old and wiring anything is a treacherous act in its self, and I am happy to report we were successful and the fountain is now running creating tranquil sound to relax with.

Not stopping with this wiring project was my plan, you see I live about 13 miles from the Massachusetts northern border in New Hampshire, and many of the neighbors are transplanted from Massachusetts. My neighbors have made comments about the large size of my American flag attached to my 30-foot flagpole, with a large gold eagle on top, located and planted freely in my front yard, on more than one occasion.

Perhaps I am too patriotic, is it possible to be too patriotic? The dedication to installing and having a running water fountain acquired the same wiring talent needed to place a bright spotlight on this American flag in my front yard; I owe this to my neighbors. Now our flag is visible for many miles a proud red, white, and blue American flag waving freely in the night. Perhaps I am too patriotic, and honestly, that is a good place to be!

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